Ch 11: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Writing Arguments

About This Chapter

Use this chapter to reinforce your knowledge of the parts of an argument. Review the elements to keep mind when writing a strong argument as you prepare for the NYSTCE English Language Arts Exam.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Writing Arguments - Chapter Summary

As part of your studies for the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations (NYSTCE) English Language Arts exam, this chapter will help you review the structures and elements of a strong argument. Start your review by watching our expert instructors in a series of engaging lesson videos about:

  • Claims, counterclaims, reasons and evidence
  • Processes of writing a strong argument
  • Uses of rhetorical skills in essay writing
  • Structures of arguments
  • Handling opposing views in an essay
  • Developing conclusions that support an argument
  • Statements that strengthen or weaken arguments
  • Techniques for strengthening an argument

Enjoy the convenience of studying online and learning through a device such as a smartphone or tablet. All of the video lessons include tags that allow you to navigate from one segment to the next. Complete the quizzes that accompany these lessons to assess your knowledge of the subjects presented in this chapter.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Writing Arguments Objectives

On test day the NYSTCE English Language Arts will measure your understanding of the English language arts to determine whether you have the knowledge needed to become an English language-arts teacher. To achieves its objective, this exam asks a series of 90 multiple-choice questions and one constructed-response item. You'll need to answer every question within three hours and 15 minutes. The Writing Arguments competency area of the exam is the equivalent of 9% of the test score. This chapter will help you prepare for these questions by reviewing key elements of and techniques for writing a strong argument.

8 Lessons in Chapter 11: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Writing Arguments
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

1. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

How to Write a Great Argument

2. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

3. Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

In this video, you will explore the basics of identifying your purpose and audience and learn how to use effective rhetorical skills in your persuasive writing.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

4. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

5. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

Writing Conclusions to Arguments

6. Writing Conclusions to Arguments

You have just finished writing an essay in which you have detailed the main points and support for your argument. But how do you finish your essay? This lesson outlines how to write an effective conclusion.

How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

7. How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

In this lesson, we will learn how to recognize statements that strengthen or weaken arguments. We will pay special attention to identifying strong and weak claims, reasons, and evidence.

Revising & Strengthening a Written Argument

8. Revising & Strengthening a Written Argument

You've written an argument and now all you have to do is turn it in, right? Wrong! This lesson outlines some strategies for making a written argument stronger.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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