Ch 9: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Analyzing Informational Texts

About This Chapter

We can show you how to derive meaning from informational texts as you prepare for your NYSTCE English Language Arts test. Our short, user-friendly video lessons help you review the material, and we also include quizzes for self-assessment.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Analyzing Informational Texts - Chapter Summary

Use this chapter to practice figuring out the meaning of informational texts for your exam. Review both construction and evaluation techniques through our targeted video lessons. The topics that follow are included in this study:

  • Defining informational text
  • Interpreting and deriving evidence from informational text
  • Connecting ides in informational text
  • Using supplemental features of informational text
  • Point-of-view and purpose in informational text
  • Persuasive text and argument structure
  • Analyzing an argument's effectiveness
  • Evaluating rhetorical devices
  • Evaluating reasoning

Complete the quiz at the end of each lesson for immediate feedback. You can also experience the kinds of questions that might appear on your exam.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Analyzing Informational Texts Objectives

The multiple-choice writing portion constitutes about 22% of your test. Review the following topics areas in preparation:

  • Language choice for various purposes and audiences
  • References to text, other works and personal experience when responding in writing to a literary selection
  • Literary element usage, such as point-of-view, theme, characters, plot and setting
  • Analysis of writing that portrays numerous layers of meaning
  • Writing strategies using specific genre conventions, in addition to inventive text structures or language
  • Voice in writing for literary expression and response

The test has approximately 90 multiple-choice questions. Additionally, a self-constructed written assignment composes about ten percent of the exam. In this written assignment, you can put to use some of the skills practiced in this chapter of our online study guide as you respond to a piece of writing. Effective use of your skills, with good examples and sound reasoning, determines your score for this section.

11 Lessons in Chapter 9: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Analyzing Informational Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

1. What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

This lesson will help you understand and identify all components of informational text. Learn more about informational text and see examples in this lesson.

Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

2. Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

Informational nonfiction is a large category that includes various types of writing. Learn about two of those types, articles and speeches, in this video lesson.

Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

3. Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

In this lesson, we will explore informational texts. Along the way, we will discover a few tips to make reading this type of text easier, and we will pay special attention to textual evidence.

How to Connect Ideas in an Informational Text

4. How to Connect Ideas in an Informational Text

Informational texts are factual, nonfiction writings. In order for us to learn new information, we should be able to find and connect the ideas in an informational text, and this lesson will introduce the key features that organize these ideas.

How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

5. How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

Informational texts are nonfiction writings that inform the audience about a topic. To help organize these texts, supplemental features are used. These include print features, organizational aids, and visuals.

Informational Texts: Organizational Features & Structures

6. Informational Texts: Organizational Features & Structures

Informational texts are a type of nonfiction, factual writing. This lesson will identify the organizational features and structures of informational texts. It will also discuss the different patterns an author may use.

What is Persuasive Text? - Definition & Examples

7. What is Persuasive Text? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will teach you how to identify all components of persuasive writing. You'll learn more about informational texts and test your understanding through a brief quiz.

Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

8. Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

In this lesson, consider examples of an argument, as the term is understood in philosophy. You'll learn how to create appropriate premises and how this influences how likely it is for a listener to accept your conclusion.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

9. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze an argument. We will pay close attention to the parts of an argument and the questions we must ask about each of those parts in order to determine the argument's effectiveness and validity.

Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

10. Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

In this lesson, we will study a variety of rhetorical devices that commonly appear in written texts. We will look at rhetoric on the level of sounds, words, sentences, and figures of speech.

How to Evaluate Reasoning

11. How to Evaluate Reasoning

Evaluating reasoning in an essay or article is an important step in critical analysis. Being able to judge if something is reasonable whether or not you agree with the argument will be our learning focus for this video.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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