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Ch 19: NYSTCE Social Studies: A New Nation

About This Chapter

Refresh your knowledge of the Articles of Confederation, the Bill of Rights and more by examining the U.S. as a new nation in this chapter. The video lessons can help improve your ability to succeed on the NYSTCE Social Studies assessment.

NYSTCE Social Studies: A New Nation - Chapter Summary

The entertaining video lessons in this chapter can prepare you to answer a variety of questions about the U.S. as a new nation on the NYSTCE Social Studies assessment. Take advantage of quality instruction that explores the history of this nation and enhances your ability to:

  • Describe the Articles of Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance, and the events of the Constitutional Convention
  • Explain the reason for ratifying the Constitution and how it led to the development of a new government
  • Discuss the Bill of Rights and the importance of John Adams' presidency and Thomas Jefferson's election
  • Share details about James Madison and the causes and effects of the War of 1812
  • Provide information about Monroe's presidency and foreign policy
  • Detail the events of John Quincy Adams' presidency, as well as the conflict between Andrew Jackson and the Whig Party

Boost your confidence by reviewing the lessons as videos or refer to the full transcripts that have in-depth vocabulary words. Once you've gained insight into this chapter on the new nation, you can see how well you understand the lessons by taking short self-assessment quizzes and a broader chapter exam. As with the lessons, you can revisit the quizzes and exam as often as needed. In no time, you'll feel prepared to breeze through questions on the actual test.

11 Lessons in Chapter 19: NYSTCE Social Studies: A New Nation
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

1. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

2. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

3. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

4. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

5. President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

John Adams was an important founder of the United States. In many ways, he was the voice of the Revolution. As president, he had some proud shining moments and one major blight on his legacy.

President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

6. President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

The presidential election of 1800 was a rematch between President John Adams and Vice President Thomas Jefferson. An electoral tie between Jefferson and his running mate forced the House of Representatives to decide. The election inaugurated 24 years of political dominance for the Democratic-Republican Party.

President Madison and the War of 1812

7. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

War of 1812: Causes & Effects

8. War of 1812: Causes & Effects

In this lesson, you'll examine the events that led to the War of 1812, as well as the effects that the war had on a young American nation. Then, you'll be able to test your understanding with a short quiz.

James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

9. James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

Can you imagine a time when there was only one political party in the United States? Find out why James Monroe was one of the nation's most popular presidents during his lifetime and learn about his foreign policy that endured for nearly a century.

President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

10. President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

The election of 1824 and its candidates played a huge role in the election of John Quincy Adams as president. In this lesson, look at the dramatic turn in presidential politics and the not-so-remarkable presidency of this public servant.

Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

11. Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

In this lesson, we will discuss how Andrew Jackson's administration strengthened executive power as well as the rise of the Whig Party in opposition to Jackson and his policies.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the NYSTCE Social Studies (115): Practice & Study Guide course

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