Ch 25: NYSTCE Social Studies: Reconstruction

About This Chapter

This chapter presents an overview of the era of Reconstruction following the American Civil War to help you study for any pertinent questions that may appear on the NYSTCE Social Studies exam.

NYSTCE Social Studies: Reconstruction - Chapter Summary

The Reconstruction period had many effects felt throughout the economy, the population and the political landscape. This set of video lessons in the NYSTCE Social Studies course engages you the same way you can engage your students when teaching post-Civil War material and provides you the opportunity you need to refresh your memory for your upcoming certification exam. The following topics are found in this chapter:

  • Reconstruction amendments
  • Successes and failures of Reconstruction
  • The effects on African Americans and the South
  • Westward expansion
  • The impact of the Transcontinental Railroad
  • Native Americans during Reconstruction
  • Immigration patterns

This chapter contains self-assessment quizzes that cover the included material, allowing you to test your knowledge of Reconstruction history ahead of the NYSTCE Social Studies exam. You can even take the quizzes while you are away from the computer, as Study.com has optimized this course to be compatible with all mobile devices.

NYSTCE Social Studies: Reconstruction Chapter Objectives

The NYSTCE Social Studies exam is given to all social studies teachers in the state of New York who are ready to earn their certification. Questions on Reconstruction will be found in the History subarea of the test, a section entirely in multiple-choice format that constitutes 35% of the exam.

9 Lessons in Chapter 25: NYSTCE Social Studies: Reconstruction
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

1. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

2. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

3. Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

In this lesson, we'll explore the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on the people of the South. We'll look at rights and opportunities for African Americans, economic growth, resentment and violence, and the sharecropping system.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

4. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

5. Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

Between the mid-1800s and the turn of the 20th century, the American frontier opened and closed abruptly. What factors influenced this land rush, and how did it help shape American history?

Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

6. Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

After decades of wrangling, plans were finalized for construction of a transcontinental railroad during the Civil War. After completion in 1869, the railroad changed many aspects of American life, for better or worse.

Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

7. Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

In the second half of the 19th century, the federal government attempted to control Native American nations. This led to violent conflicts known together as the Indian Wars. Learn about famous battles, and the attempt to 'civilize' tribes through various policies.

Immigration Patterns in the Late 1800s

8. Immigration Patterns in the Late 1800s

This lesson describes the immigration patterns of the late 1800s. Focusing on the new immigrants and birds of passage, it will highlight the hardships and discrimination these groups faced.

Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

9. Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

Between the Civil War and WWI, America experienced a massive third wave of immigration. Learn about where these immigrants came from, where they went and how 'native' Americans responded to them.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the NYSTCE Social Studies (115): Practice & Study Guide course

Support