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Ch 17: OAE Early Childhood Education: American History Overview

About This Chapter

Use these lessons to review the American history topics that an Ohio teacher of early childhood age students should know. Our videos and quizzes will aid you in correctly answering these types of questions on the OAE Early Childhood Education exam.

OAE Early Childhood Education: American History Overview - Chapter Summary

Refresh your knowledge of American history from the early European settlements to the War on Terror with the video lessons in this chapter. You should be ready to answer questions on the following when you take the OAE Early Childhood Education exam:

  • Founding of the New England colonies
  • Identifying events that led to the American Revolution
  • Exploring how the United States was established
  • Examining the U.S. Constitution
  • Listing causes of World War I
  • Describing the start of World War II
  • Exploring the civil rights movement of the 1960s
  • Looking at the 9/11 attacks and the War on Terror

Overview of the OAE Early Childhood Education: American History Overview Chapter

In Ohio, passing the OAE Early Childhood Education exam is required of all teachers who want certification in pre-k through grade 3. The exam is divided into four sections. The material covered by the lessons in this chapter is in the exam's section on learning across the curriculum, which comprises 36% of the total test score.

All the 150 questions on the OAE Early Childhood Education exam are multiple-choice, and the test is delivered on computer. You can practice answering questions in this format with the quizzes that are paired with our lessons. These quizzes also allow you to check your preparation and see in what areas you might need some more study prior to test day.

12 Lessons in Chapter 17: OAE Early Childhood Education: American History Overview
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Puritans and the Founding of the New England Colonies

1. The Puritans and the Founding of the New England Colonies

Learn about the people and motives that led to the founding of Massachusetts Bay Colony, as well as the growth and internal dissent that led to the establishment of Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire.

The 13 Colonies: Life in Early America

2. The 13 Colonies: Life in Early America

What was it like to live in America during the colonial period? Just like today, it depended where you were. Learn about the factors that categorized all of the American colonies, as well as the differences between the northern, middle and southern colonies.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

3. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

Three years of calm followed the Boston Massacre and the repeal of most Townshend duties. But no sooner had Parliament passed a new tax on tea than the colonies were in an uproar again about taxation without representation. What followed were the Boston Tea Party and the fateful last steps leading to war.

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

4. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

5. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

6. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

7. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

8. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

World War II: The Start of the Second World War

9. World War II: The Start of the Second World War

Learn all about the start of World War II and why the League of Nations could not stop aggression by Italy, Germany and Japan in the 1930s, which led to the outbreak of this second global conflict.

The Vietnam War: Causes, Conflicts & Effects

10. The Vietnam War: Causes, Conflicts & Effects

The Vietnam War was the longest and most polarizing conflict in the history of the United States. Learn about the causes of the war as well as its effects on the United States.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

11. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s was an extension of the progress made during the 1950s. Learn about the movement's landmark achievements, its fracturing and its legacies.

George W. Bush: the 9/11 Terrorist Attack & War on Terror

12. George W. Bush: the 9/11 Terrorist Attack & War on Terror

The September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States forced President George W. Bush to reappraise his foreign policy. Learn about the tragic day, the Bush Doctrine and the ensuing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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