Ch 35: OAE - Integrated Social Studies: The American Revolution

About This Chapter

Use our lessons and quizzes to review the causes, events and impact of the American Revolution as you study for the OAE - Integrated Social Studies exam. Our videos can help you correctly answer these related history questions on this exam.

OAE - Integrated Social Studies: The American Revolution - Chapter Summary

This chapter's lessons look at the causes of the Revolutionary War, as well as major battles and events and the impact of the war. The videos and quizzes cover the following topics that may come up on the OAE - Integrated Social Studies exam:

  • Causes and effects of the French and Indian War
  • The Sons of Liberty and the Boston Tea Party
  • The Boston Massacre
  • Battles at Bunker Hill, Lexington and Concord
  • The First and Second Continental Congresses
  • Thomas Paine and Common Sense
  • The Declaration of Independence and its meaning
  • George Washington's leadership
  • Southern loyalists
  • The social and economic impact of the revolution
  • The Treaty of Paris

You can watch these lessons as your schedule allows, on a computer or mobile device. Written transcripts accompany each lesson, some with links to text lessons that have more information.

Objectives of the OAE - Integrated Social Studies: The American Revolution Chapter

Passing the OAE - Integrated Social Studies exam is one of the requirements for certification to teach the subject in Ohio. The exam is divided into five domains, and questions on the material this chapter covers are part of the U.S. history domain, which makes up 25% of the exam's total score.

All questions on the exam are multiple choice, and the exam is computer-delivered. The quizzes that follow each of our lessons offer practice answering questions in this format and also provide the opportunity to assess your knowledge and see what requires further review.

11 Lessons in Chapter 35: OAE - Integrated Social Studies: The American Revolution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

1. The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

In the mid-1700s, the Seven Years' War involved all of the world's major colonial powers on five continents. The biggest fight was between France and Great Britain, and the victor would come away with control of North America.

Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

2. Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

In 1763, British Prime Minister George Grenville passed new legislation aimed at solving some of the empire's problems stemming from the French and Indian War. The colonists cried, 'Taxation without representation is tyranny!' They organized boycotts, the Sons of Liberty and the Stamp Act Congress until some of the new taxes were lifted.

Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

3. Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

After overturning the hated Stamp Act, Parliament asserted its right to tax the colonists without representation by passing the Declaratory Act. When the Townshend Acts imposed import duties, the colonists went into action again. An escalating cycle of violence ended with the Boston Massacre, resulting in the cancellation of all duties except the one on tea.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

4. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

Three years of calm followed the Boston Massacre and the repeal of most Townshend duties. But no sooner had Parliament passed a new tax on tea than the colonies were in an uproar again about taxation without representation. What followed were the Boston Tea Party and the fateful last steps leading to war.

Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

5. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

6. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

7. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

8. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

9. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

After surrendering their northern army in the American Revolution, British leaders looked to the Southern Strategy. General Charles Cornwallis hoped that loyalist forces would hold territory so he could sweep north and end the war in Virginia.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

10. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

11. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Ohio Assessments for Educators - Integrated Social Studies (025): Practice & Study Guide course

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