Ch 43: OAE Middle Grades Social Studies: Human Rights

About This Chapter

Prepare to take the Ohio Assessments for Educators (OAE) Middle Grades Social Studies exam by reviewing material relating to human rights. Our video lessons and quizzes offer an in-depth review of human rights legislation and historical activity.

OAE Middle Grades Social Studies: Human Rights - Chapter Summary

Use this chapter's lessons to reinforce your knowledge of human rights laws and examples of human rights conflicts and development throughout history. Each lesson focuses on specific concepts and historical events that you can expect to be tested on when taking the OAE Middle Grades Social Studies exam. The following abilities will reflect a successful review of these topics:

  • Summarizing details about the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights
  • Relating events of the French Revolution that addressed human rights
  • Providing information about universal human rights and their protection
  • Describing the activities of UNICEF
  • Defining ethnocentrism and cultural relativity
  • Understanding human rights violations and their justification
  • Detailing examples of ethnic cleansing throughout history
  • Identifying crimes of war and instances of genocide throughout history
  • Discussing the origins and growth of American slavery

The easy-to-follow lessons combine simple explanations with examples, key term definitions and illustrations to make learning the material fun. You can re-take the self-assessment quizzes as often as needed to ensure your full understanding of the topics before you take the OAE Middle Grades Social Studies exam.

12 Lessons in Chapter 43: OAE Middle Grades Social Studies: Human Rights
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Declaration of Independence: Summary & Analysis

1. The Declaration of Independence: Summary & Analysis

The Declaration of Independence is one of the most important documents in U.S. History and led to the country's independence from Great Britain. In this lesson, we will review the main components of this important document.

The Bill of Rights: Summary & Analysis

2. The Bill of Rights: Summary & Analysis

Why do Americans have certain freedoms? This lesson reviews the events leading to the Bill of Rights. It also summarizes each of the ten amendments and analyzes the importance of each one.

The Constitutional Monarchy: Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen & the Civil Constitution

3. The Constitutional Monarchy: Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen & the Civil Constitution

In this lesson, we will study the moderate phase of the French Revolution, focusing specifically on the Tennis Court Oath, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, and the constitutional monarchy.

Human Rights Treaties, Humanitarian Intervention & Political Mindsets

4. Human Rights Treaties, Humanitarian Intervention & Political Mindsets

The international community acknowledges the existence of certain universal human rights. In this lesson, you'll learn about how the international community seeks to enforce these rights and hold sovereign states accountable for their violation.

United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF): History & Purpose

5. United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF): History & Purpose

It may be cliche, but children really are our future, and the majority of the world's children are threatened by poverty, malnutrition, disease, discrimination, and violence. In this lesson, you'll learn about UNICEF and its efforts to fix this problem.

Cultural Relativity, Ethnocentrism & the Rights of Humans

6. Cultural Relativity, Ethnocentrism & the Rights of Humans

This lesson will seek to explain the concepts of ethnocentrism and cultural relativity. In doing so, it will also highlight the role human rights plays in the actual working out of these two concepts amid cultures.

Analyzing Justifications for Human Rights Violations

7. Analyzing Justifications for Human Rights Violations

Human rights are an important issue in modern global politics, but sadly they are still often violated. In this lesson, we'll look at some of the major justifications for human rights violations, and see how they've been used throughout history.

Ethnic Cleansing: Definition & Examples

8. Ethnic Cleansing: Definition & Examples

This lesson will explain the tragedy of ethnic cleansing. In doing so, it will highlight examples from the 1990s, the Holocaust, the Spanish Inquisition, and even the ancient world.

Crimes of War & the Genocide Convention

9. Crimes of War & the Genocide Convention

The following lesson will cover how crimes of war and genocide are identified, as well as the steps taken to prevent them from reoccurring. A short quiz will follow to check your understanding.

Slavery in Early America: Characteristics & Opposition

10. Slavery in Early America: Characteristics & Opposition

The institution of slavery in early America was a source of both economic profits and divisive tensions. It began as a peculiar institution of colonial society and blossomed into a sectional issue that threatened to destroy the young United States.

Irish Famine: Contributing Factors & Effects

11. Irish Famine: Contributing Factors & Effects

The Irish Famine is one of the darkest periods in Irish history. In this lesson, we will explore the causes of this catastrophe, as well the impacts it had on the Irish people and identity.

Human Rights Advocates: Effects & Examples

12. Human Rights Advocates: Effects & Examples

This lesson will discuss human right advocates throughout history. We will explore the causes exemplary human rights figures have fought for and the impact that these advocates have had on human history.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Ohio Assessments for Educators - Middle Grades Social Studies (031): Practice & Study Guide course

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