Ch 34: Ohio Assessments ELA: Analytical Writing Strategies

About This Chapter

Prepare to take the Ohio Assessments for Educators - English Language Arts assessment by watching the engaging video lessons in this chapter. Use the lessons to strengthen your knowledge of analytical writing strategies, and take self-assessment quizzes to assess your comprehension of these strategies.

Ohio Assessments ELA: Analytical Writing Strategies - Chapter Summary

Watch engaging video lessons on analytical essays, thesis statements and introducing a topic as you study analytical writing strategies in this chapter. These lessons are designed to get you ready for the Ohio Assessments for Educators - English Language Arts assessment and can prepare you to address the following on the exam:

  • Steps for writing an analytical essay and thesis statement
  • Organizing and categorizing ideas, concepts and information
  • Definition transition statements and new criticism in literature
  • Introducing a topic clearly with a summary review
  • Analyzing and interpreting an article, speech, diary or letter
  • Making text-to-text connections between written works

The video lessons are designed to give you the most effective learning experience by providing step-by-step guidance while offering the materials in an entertaining package. By taking advantage of this unique approach to online instruction, you are able to fully comprehend the lessons while learning at your own pace.

Ohio Assessments ELA: Analytical Writing Strategies Chapter Objectives

The Ohio Assessments for Educators - English Language Arts assessment gauges how well you understand the materials while ensuring you're prepared to secure educator licensure in Ohio. The topics covered in this Ohio Assessments ELA: Analytical Writing Strategies chapter are found in the modes of writing section, which constitutes about 23% of the total exam. You can watch the video lessons in this chapter to brush up your knowledge of analytical writing strategies as you prepare to take the exam. You can also take self-assessment quizzes to gauge how well you understand the materials while getting practice in answering questions similar to those found on the test.

All questions on the exam are multiple choice and based on specific competencies. The questions typically require that you read or examine a short paragraph, excerpt, passage or illustration then choose one of four answers that best responds to that question.

10 Lessons in Chapter 34: Ohio Assessments ELA: Analytical Writing Strategies
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Write a Thesis Statement

1. How to Write a Thesis Statement

Find yourself confounded by thesis statements? Writing an excellent thesis statement doesn't require magic or luck, but it does require a few key elements we'll lay out for you in the lesson that follows.

How to Introduce a Topic Clearly With a Summary Preview

2. How to Introduce a Topic Clearly With a Summary Preview

Here's a simple, surefire way to write an introduction for your paper, including a summary preview (or what some teachers call a thesis statement). This works for almost all papers, including definition, classification, comparison/contrast or cause/effect papers. Try this simple approach to set up your paper easily.

Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

3. Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

In this lesson, you will learn clear, simple ways to group your ideas together. First, you'll figure out what the paper is about, and then the rest is easy!

Transition Statements: Definition & Examples

4. Transition Statements: Definition & Examples

Transition statements are a sort of signal. They are words, phrases, or sentences that connect one topic or idea to another in a paper or essay in a smooth, coherent way. They essentially let your reader know that you about to change directions.

New Criticism in Literature: Definition & Examples

5. New Criticism in Literature: Definition & Examples

New Criticism is one of several ways of looking at and analyzing literature. In this lesson, find out what it is, go through some examples of reading with a New Critic's eye, and take a quiz to check your understanding.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting an Article

6. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting an Article

When reading news articles, we often get caught up in the drama, but in order to analyze an article we need to look at it differently. In this lesson, we'll discuss exactly how to do that.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Speech

7. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Speech

There are many famous speeches that are inspiring and memorable, but to effectively analyze a speech we need to look at it in a new way. In this lesson we'll discuss exactly how to do this.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Diary

8. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Diary

Reading someone's diary seems like a slightly scandalous thing to do, but published diaries can be analyzed, interpreted, and used as research materials. In this lesson, we'll look at how to read a diary in this way.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Letter

9. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Letter

Writing a letter to someone may seem like a casual thing, but letters can be analyzed as primary sources that represent a piece of history. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to effectively analyze a letter.

Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

10. Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

In this lesson, we will discuss connecting different writings to each other by learning about the authors, examining the literary elements, and reflecting on the writings.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Ohio Assessments for Educators - English Language Arts (020): Practice & Study Guide course

Support