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Ch 18: Organic Chemistry Basics

About This Chapter

Watch video lessons and become familiar with the basics of organic chemistry and carbon compounds. The self-assessment quizzes can help you check your knowledge of organic chemistry.

Organic Chemistry Basics - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon compounds, or the chemical substances that form the basis of life forms and organisms. In this chapter, instructor Meg Desko will provide you with an introduction to carbon-based or organic molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. In particular, you'll learn about the structure and purpose of different functional groups, such as those found in ammonia, sugars or even your own body. When you complete this chapter, you have an understanding of the following:

  • How functional groups can be used to identify biological molecules
  • Natural and man-made polymers, such as plastic
  • The carbohydrates and sugars found in everyday foods
  • Lipids and dietary fats
  • Proteins and peptide bonds
  • The different types of reactions that take place between organic compounds

Video Objectives
Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional GroupsDefine and discuss alcohols, aldehydes, amines, esters, ethers, halides, ketones and organic acids.
Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and PolymersIdentify and explain the basis of complex molecules and repeating units of molecules.
Structure and Function of CarbohydratesDescribe the organizational arrangement and use of organic compounds.
Structure and Function of LipidsDescribe the organizational arrangement and use of organic compounds associated with fatty acids.
Proteins I: Structure and FunctionDiscuss the formation and purpose of proteins.
Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide BondsDescribe the different types of peptides and how they are formed.
Proteins III: Structures and Characteristics of the 20 Amino AcidsExplain how amino acids form polypeptide chains in proteins.
Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary StructureDiscuss the higher order of protein structures.
Organic Reactions: Addition, Substitution, Polymerization, Cracking, Oxidation, Esterification and FermentationDefine and discuss the different chemical reactions of organic compounds.

11 Lessons in Chapter 18: Organic Chemistry Basics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Organic Chemistry & the Study of Carbon Compound Life Forms

1. Organic Chemistry & the Study of Carbon Compound Life Forms

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon-containing compounds. This lesson will explore why carbon is such an important element, and how organic chemistry is related to your life.

Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

2. Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

Organic molecules contain carbon and other atoms often found together and behaving similarly are called functional groups. Learn about carbon and atoms in functional groups in this introduction to organic molecules.

Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

3. Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

Polymers can be defined as long-chain molecules composed of small monomers. Dig deeper into the relationship between monomers and polymers in this introduction to organic molecules.

Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

4. Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are organic compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, and contain various functional groups. Learn about the structure and function of different carbohydrates like sugars, fiber, and starches, and the function of carbs in humans.

Structure and Function of Lipids

5. Structure and Function of Lipids

Lipids, commonly known as fats and steroids, are polar molecules that are essential to life. Explore the different structures and types of lipids--such as fats, oils and hormones--and how structure determines the type and function.

Proteins I: Structure and Function

6. Proteins I: Structure and Function

Proteins can be defined as molecules composed of amino acids and peptide bonds. Learn about the structure and function of proteins using keratin as an example.

Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

7. Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

Take a journey with the amino acid glycine as it searches for its peptide-turning amino acid. Learn about the 20 amino acids and their categorizations of polar negative, positive, neutral, hydrophobic non-polar, and special.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

8. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

Discover how amino acids, polymerization, and peptide bonds work in the formation of proteins. The topics covered are how peptides are formed, how they are written, and the different types of peptides.

Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

9. Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

Proteins can be classified according to their structure as either primary, secondary, tertiary, or quaternary. Explore the classifications of proteins by structure, and discover how structures differ from one another.

Organic Chemical Reactions: Addition, Substitution, Polymerization & Cracking

10. Organic Chemical Reactions: Addition, Substitution, Polymerization & Cracking

Organic molecules can combine, swap atoms, break apart and even make more of themselves. In this lesson, we will explore several organic reactions with examples.

Organic Chemical Reactions: Redox, Esterification & Fermentation

11. Organic Chemical Reactions: Redox, Esterification & Fermentation

There are many different types of reactions that occur in organic chemistry. This lesson will highlight three reactions, explaining which organic molecules are the reactants and which are the products, as well as what occurs during the reaction.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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