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Ch 45: Organic & Inorganic Chemistry

About This Chapter

Strengthen your knowledge of organic and inorganic chemistry by reviewing the entertaining videos in this chapter. Lessons introduce you to organic molecules and explore types of proteins and redox reactions.

Organic & Inorganic Chemistry - Chapter Summary

This chapter makes it easy for you to boost your comprehension of organic and inorganic chemistry. Review lessons that examine organic molecules, proteins, hydrolysis, oxidation and more. Once you've explored these lessons, you will have the knowledge to do the following:

  • Describe functional groups, monomers and polymers as related to organic molecules
  • Share details about the structure, function, amino acids, polymerization and peptide bonds of proteins
  • Discuss the structure and characteristics of the 20 amino acids
  • Provide information about the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins
  • Define redox reactions, and discuss electron carriers and cellular respiration
  • Explain the process of oxidation and reduction reactions in the metabolism
  • Examine hydrolysis and dehydration

All of the lessons in this chapter are available as videos and full transcripts. Access them any time, day or night, from your smartphone, computer or tablet. While reviewing the lessons, if you need additional clarification on a topic, feel free to submit your question to our experts. Test your knowledge of organic and inorganic chemistry by taking lesson quizzes and a practice chapter exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 45: Organic & Inorganic Chemistry
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

1. Introduction to Organic Molecules I: Functional Groups

Organic chemistry is the study of molecules that come from living things and previously living things. Learn more on an introduction to organic molecules and functional groups within biological science.

Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

2. Introduction to Organic Molecules II: Monomers and Polymers

An organic molecule is a complex molecule that is primarily made of carbon atoms and is bonded with other elements or other carbon atoms. Learn more about organic molecules, monomers, polymers and their functions or definitions.

Proteins I: Structure and Function

3. Proteins I: Structure and Function

Without peptide bonds joining together chains of amino acids to create large organic compounds called proteins, it would be impossible for humans to function. Explore the structure of proteins and how they function as enzymes to trigger molecular reactions and some of the many other functions of proteins in the human body.

Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

4. Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

Proteins are essential molecules made up of one or more long chains of amino acids. Explore the structure and characteristics of the twenty amino acids, discover the differences between polar positive and polar neutral amino acids, and learn about special amino acids.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

5. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

Proteins are molecules made up of chains of amino acids bound together by peptides. Explore how polymerization helps form peptide bonds, discover how peptides are written, and learn the different types of peptides.

Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

6. Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

Proteins are essential molecules made up of one or more long chains of amino acids. Explore primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary protein structure, then discover the effects of denaturation.

Redox (Oxidation-Reduction) Reactions: Definitions and Examples

7. Redox (Oxidation-Reduction) Reactions: Definitions and Examples

Redox reactions or oxidation-reduction reactions are chemical reactions that involve the transfer of electrons from one reactant to another. Learn about the process of oxidation-reduction reactions and find different examples of reactions between oxidizing and reducing agents.

Redox Reactions & Electron Carriers in Cellular Respiration: Definitions and Examples

8. Redox Reactions & Electron Carriers in Cellular Respiration: Definitions and Examples

Cellular respiration is an important process that helps organisms produce energy. Learn about the definitions of redox reactions and electron carriers, including NAD and FAD, in cellular respiration, and find an example of the basic formula that describes the process.

Oxidation & Reduction Reactions in the Metabolism: Process & Significance

9. Oxidation & Reduction Reactions in the Metabolism: Process & Significance

Cellular respiration uses 'redox' reactions to metabolize and produce ATP energy in two distinct, but paired reactions: Oxidation (loss of electrons) and reduction reactions (gaining electrons). Learn the process of these in cellular respiration through the Krebs cycle, and its significance to the electron transport chain (ETC) as well.

Hydrolysis and Dehydration: Definitions & Examples

10. Hydrolysis and Dehydration: Definitions & Examples

Two important processes our bodies undertake are the reactions of hydrolysis and dehydration. Using definitions and examples, learn about these building blocks of life and explore how dehydration removes, and hydrolysis breaks with, water, then explore how enzymes aid both reactions.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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