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Ch 8: Organization of a Speech: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4

About This Chapter

Find lessons for eleventh and twelfth grade English. The following lessons meet the Common Core Speaking and Listening standard for organizing a speech (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4).

Standard: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks. (CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.SL.11-12.4).

About This Chapter

Students who have understanding of the concepts in this standard know how to organize a speech in a clear and purposeful way. They know how to create a main idea that has a clear perspective and uses appropriate supporting evidence. Students can present a speech that is easy to understand and addresses alternative viewpoints. They are also knowledgeable about how to prepare a speech to meet the needs of their audience.

Some of the concepts covered in these lessons include:

  • Main idea development
  • Characteristics of supporting ideas for a speech
  • Patterns of organization for informative and persuasive speeches
  • Methods for using supporting materials in a speech
  • Preparation and speaking outlines
  • Standard form for speech outlines

Students show they have mastered this standard when they can organize a speech that is appropriate for the audience and the speaker. They can develop a main idea using criteria that they previously established. Students know what characteristics are used to select supporting ideas for a speech and can describe different patterns for organizing main ideas of informative and persuasive speeches. Students who have mastery of this standard can also create outlines for speeches and understand the importance of a preparation outline and a speaking outline.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Here are some tips for how to use these lessons to support instruction in the standard:

Lessons on Developing a Main Idea

Watch lessons on main idea development in class and assign a topic to the entire class. Ask students to identify the criteria that would be used to develop a main idea for the topic. Have students list characteristics that would work for the main idea of the topic. Assign students to write a main idea using the criteria and characteristics discussed in class.

Lessons on Selecting and Incorporating Supporting Materials into a Speech

Watch lessons on supporting materials in class. Divide students into groups and ask them to develop guidelines for selecting appropriate materials to use in a speech. Give students a list of supporting materials for a previously written speech. Ask each group to identify the points that should be incorporated into the speech and which should be left out. Discuss each group's results as a class.

Lessons on Outlining a Speech

Watch lessons on speech outlines then discuss in class some of the reasons for using outlines and the elements that are part of an outline. Hand out a list of out of order sentences that are part of a previously written speech. Ask students to order the sentences into a useful and appropriate outline for the speech.

8 Lessons in Chapter 8: Organization of a Speech: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Speech Organization: Importance to Speaker & Audience

1. Speech Organization: Importance to Speaker & Audience

In speech writing, it is important to keep the information organized, which demonstrates credibility and makes the speech easier to comprehend. It starts with the main idea, the speech body and a compelling conclusion.

Developing & Selecting the Main Ideas of a Speech

2. Developing & Selecting the Main Ideas of a Speech

The objective of a good speech is to persuade, inform or entertain an audience. To accomplish this, one must have a specific purpose for the speech. This is the main idea or thesis statement and it must be prevalent throughout the speech.

Supporting Ideas of a Speech: Development, Selection and Characteristics

3. Supporting Ideas of a Speech: Development, Selection and Characteristics

When used appropriately, supporting ideas will help strengthen your speech and persuade your audience by giving it the depth needed to add clarity and credibility to your claims.

Patterns of Organization for Informative Speeches

4. Patterns of Organization for Informative Speeches

Informational speeches are designed to inform an audience about a topic. The information should be organized so it is clear, logical and easy to understand and follow. The pattern of organization depends greatly on the information presented.

Patterns of Organization for Persuasive Speeches

5. Patterns of Organization for Persuasive Speeches

Organizing information for a persuasive speech will help to convince your audience of your point and keeps information flowing in a logical order. This can be done using a problem/solution order or Monroe's motivated sequence pattern.

How to Work Supporting Materials into Your Speech

6. How to Work Supporting Materials into Your Speech

A good speech should include supporting materials from secondary sources to back up claims made within the speech. They add credibility and also provide the audience with a way to research more about the topic.

Preparation & Speaking Outlines: Differences & Importance

7. Preparation & Speaking Outlines: Differences & Importance

In many public speaking classes you will be asked to create a preparation outline and a speaking outline. These outlines are important in the process of speech construction and delivery.

Outlining a Speech: Standard Form & Organization Pattern

8. Outlining a Speech: Standard Form & Organization Pattern

Sometimes understanding how to outline a speech can be one of the more difficult and confusing parts of speech construction. In this lesson, you will learn about the formatting and components of a speech.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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