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Ch 6: Organizing The Speech

About This Chapter

Watch online communications video lessons to learn about a speech's main ideas, organizational pattern, supporting materials and more. These lessons come with self-assessment quizzes to test your knowledge of the material.

Organizing the Speech - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Once you've done the legwork required to analyze your audience and research your speech, use this chapter to learn strategies for successfully ordering your ideas. Experienced instructors can show you how to make the most of organizational patterns and help ensure you've included enough supporting material for each of your main ideas. Lessons are designed to teach you the following:

  • Criteria for selecting a speech's main and supporting ideas
  • Organizational patterns for informative and persuasive speeches
  • Methods for integrating supporting material into a speech

Video Objectives
Speech Organization: Importance to Speaker & Audience Explain why the organization of a speech is important for both the speaker and the audience.
Developing & Selecting the Main Ideas of a Speech Learn what makes a good main idea, and identify criteria for determining which ones to include in your speech.
Supporting Ideas of a Speech: Development, Selection and Characteristics Identify characteristics of supporting ideas. Find out how to select the right supporting ideas for your speech.
Patterns of Organization for Informative Speeches Describe patterns for organizing the main ideas of an informative speech, including topical, comparison and contrast, chronological, causal and spatial.
Patterns of Organization for Persuasive Speeches Examine the uses of why patterns, how patterns, problem-solution patterns and Monroe's Motivated Sequence to organize a persuasive speech.
How to Work Supporting Materials into Your Speech Learn to decide how much and which kinds of supporting material you need for each main idea. Get tips for integrating supporting material into your speech.

6 Lessons in Chapter 6: Organizing The Speech
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Speech Organization: Importance to Speaker & Audience

1. Speech Organization: Importance to Speaker & Audience

In speech writing, it is important to keep the information organized, which demonstrates credibility and makes the speech easier to comprehend. It starts with the main idea, the speech body and a compelling conclusion.

Developing & Selecting the Main Ideas of a Speech

2. Developing & Selecting the Main Ideas of a Speech

The objective of a good speech is to persuade, inform or entertain an audience. To accomplish this, one must have a specific purpose for the speech. This is the main idea or thesis statement and it must be prevalent throughout the speech.

Supporting Ideas of a Speech: Development, Selection and Characteristics

3. Supporting Ideas of a Speech: Development, Selection and Characteristics

When used appropriately, supporting ideas will help strengthen your speech and persuade your audience by giving it the depth needed to add clarity and credibility to your claims.

Patterns of Organization for Informative Speeches

4. Patterns of Organization for Informative Speeches

Informational speeches are designed to inform an audience about a topic. The information should be organized so it is clear, logical and easy to understand and follow. The pattern of organization depends greatly on the information presented.

Patterns of Organization for Persuasive Speeches

5. Patterns of Organization for Persuasive Speeches

Organizing information for a persuasive speech will help to convince your audience of your point and keeps information flowing in a logical order. This can be done using a problem/solution order or Monroe's motivated sequence pattern.

How to Work Supporting Materials into Your Speech

6. How to Work Supporting Materials into Your Speech

A good speech should include supporting materials from secondary sources to back up claims made within the speech. They add credibility and also provide the audience with a way to research more about the topic.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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