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Ch 4: Overview of American Law

About This Chapter

In this chapter, you will find lessons and quizzes that will help you brush up on the definition of the rule of law, formal process of the way a bill becomes a law, powers of legislatures and more topics related to law in America.

Overview of American Law - Chapter Summary

Remember items like the formal process of a bill becoming a law, definitions of federal and local ordinances, powers of legislatures and more with this chapter. Here, you can view 5-minute videos and read through text lessons to refresh your knowledge. Brief multiple-choice quizzes are available to help you test your progress. The other topics included in this chapter are these:

  • Origins of American law
  • Theories and schools of jurisprudence
  • Powers of legislatures
  • Formal process of the way a bill becomes a law
  • Definitions of federal and local ordinances
  • Definition of the rule of law and civil disobedience

You do not have to worry about watching the lesson videos in their entirety when you only need to view certain parts. Our format lets you jump to different topics. Each lesson is created by expert instructors, and they are happy to answer any questions you may have while you're progressing through the chapter.

7 Lessons in Chapter 4: Overview of American Law
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Law: History & Origins from English Common Law

1. American Law: History & Origins from English Common Law

Our modern American law system is based on centuries of English principles regarding right and wrong. This English common law system combines with U.S. case decisions and statutes to form what we know as law. This lesson examines the origins and definitions associated with the American law system.

Schools of Jurisprudence: Theories & Definitions

2. Schools of Jurisprudence: Theories & Definitions

Jurisprudence is the study of law, or the philosophy of law. It helps us better understand the creation, application, and enforcement of laws. This lesson explains what jurisprudence is, and explores some specific schools of jurisprudence.

The Powers & Functions of Legislatures

3. The Powers & Functions of Legislatures

The following lesson will describe the common structure of most legislatures, as well as discuss their main powers and functions. A short quiz will follow the lesson to check your understanding.

How a Bill Becomes a Law: Formal Process

4. How a Bill Becomes a Law: Formal Process

In this lesson, we will review the process of how a bill becomes a law. We will take a closer look at what steps have to be taken, how a bill is changed and how it is signed into law.

Local, State & Federal Ordinances: Definitions and Differences

5. Local, State & Federal Ordinances: Definitions and Differences

In the United States, people are subject to the powers of several governmental units. Citizens must comply with federal, state and local laws - all at the same time. This lesson explores the definitions and differences between federal, state and local laws.

What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

6. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

What Is Civil Disobedience? - Definition, Acts & Examples

7. What Is Civil Disobedience? - Definition, Acts & Examples

Change never comes easy. Read on to learn about civil disobedience, its origins, tactics used in non-violent protest, and examples of civil disobedience throughout history.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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