Ch 10: Overview of Linear Momentum in Physics

About This Chapter

Study linear momentum concepts with this useful online physics chapter. These fun lessons and quizzes can help you get ahead in class, prepare for an upcoming exam or simply engage your curiosity about linear momentum.

Overview of Linear Momentum in Physics - Chapter Summary

If you need to review information regarding linear momentum in physics, this chapter can help you out. Through a series of simple and engaging lessons, you'll review information about linear momentum, isolated systems, collisions, impulse theorems, momentum formulas and much more. Each lesson comes with a short quiz to help you strengthen your linear momentum knowledge. The online format of the chapter allows you to study at school, at home, at work or when you're on the go. The chapter also includes self-assessment quizzes to help you retain your understanding of the material. By the end of the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Recognize and use the linear momentum equation
  • Apply the formula for linear momentum conservation
  • Define isolated systems in physics
  • Summarize the principles of elastic and inelastic collisions
  • Describe elastic collisions in one dimension
  • Explain momentum and impulse and their theorems
  • Use linear momentum formulas

7 Lessons in Chapter 10: Overview of Linear Momentum in Physics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Linear Momentum: Definition, Equation, and Examples

1. Linear Momentum: Definition, Equation, and Examples

Any moving object has momentum, but how much momentum it has depends on its mass and velocity. In this lesson, you'll identify linear momentum, as well as see examples of how an object's momentum is affected by mass and velocity.

Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

2. Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

The law of conservation of momentum tells us that the amount of momentum for a system doesn't change. In this lesson, we'll explore how that can be true even when the momenta of the individual components does change.

Isolated Systems in Physics: Definition and Examples

3. Isolated Systems in Physics: Definition and Examples

Systems are important to understand when studying physics, but they are not always easy to describe. In this video lesson, you'll identify isolated systems and understand what makes them unique.

Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

4. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

When objects come in contact with each other, a collision occurs. In this lesson, you'll learn about the two types of collisions as well as how momentum is conserved in each.

Elastic Collisions in One Dimension

5. Elastic Collisions in One Dimension

In this lesson, you'll learn how to solve one-dimensional elastic collision problems. You'll find that understanding the conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy is essential to solving these types of problems.

Momentum and Impulse: Definition, Theorem and Examples

6. Momentum and Impulse: Definition, Theorem and Examples

To understand how a change in momentum affects an object, we look to impulse. In this lesson, you'll understand how impulse describes an object's change in momentum, as well as how changing the force or time of the impulse can have very different outcomes.

Practice Applying Linear Momentum Formulas

7. Practice Applying Linear Momentum Formulas

Momentum is product of mass and velocity, and it is a quantity that is always conserved in collisions. In this lesson, we will dig deep into the concept of linear momentum, including practice working momentum problems.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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