Copyright

Ch 5: Overview of the Chemistry of the Earth

About This Chapter

These engaging lessons on the chemistry of the earth can help you with a class project, homework assignment, or test preparation. You can review chromatography, elements, compounds, and more from a mobile-friendly learning platform.

Overview of the Chemistry of the Earth - Chapter Summary

In this chapter on the chemistry of the earth, brief lessons cover key topics like methods of separating mixtures in earth materials and chemical nomenclature for various inorganic compounds. Additionally, you can learn more about the kinetic theory of matter. Upon completion of the chapter, you should be able to do the following:

  • Discuss elements as the building blocks of matter
  • Detail how chemical bonding forms compounds
  • Explain how compounds are joined together to make mixtures
  • Recall the four states of matter
  • Discuss chromatography, distillation, and filtration
  • Define gravimetric analysis
  • Explain the rules for naming inorganic compounds
  • Provide examples of an uncombined element

Our subject-matter experts present the information in these lessons in a way that is easy to understand and remember. If you find yourself struggling with a topic, you can use the Help feature to submit questions to the instructors. A helpful quiz is available to test your knowledge of each lesson, and the quizzes can be printed as worksheets for offline studying.

8 Lessons in Chapter 5: Overview of the Chemistry of the Earth
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Are Elements?

1. What Are Elements?

Look around you. What do you see? Elements are everywhere. They are the building blocks of all matter on Earth. In this lesson, we will discuss what an element is, how elements are written as symbols, and how elements are the building blocks of all matter.

What Is a Compound? - Combining Elements with Chemical Bonds

2. What Is a Compound? - Combining Elements with Chemical Bonds

After watching this video, you will be able to explain what a compound is, identify compounds versus regular molecules, and describe the two types of bonding that form compounds. A short quiz will follow.

Creating Mixtures by Combining Elements & Compounds

3. Creating Mixtures by Combining Elements & Compounds

Do you really know what's in your tap water? It's not just water - it's a mixture of many different things. In fact, most things are mixtures of different elements and compounds that are physically joined together.

The Kinetic Theory of Matter: Definition & The Four States of Matter

4. The Kinetic Theory of Matter: Definition & The Four States of Matter

Everything on Earth is made of matter, but that matter isn't always the same. Matter can exist in four different phases, and the kinetic theory of matter helps us understand the differences between those phases.

Chromatography, Distillation and Filtration: Methods of Separating Mixtures

5. Chromatography, Distillation and Filtration: Methods of Separating Mixtures

What are some ways that mixtures can be separated? Watch this video to explore several examples of ways you can separate a mixture into its individual components.

Separation of Mixtures in Earth Materials: Methods & Assessment

6. Separation of Mixtures in Earth Materials: Methods & Assessment

The Earth is one giant mixture of multiple substances. In this lesson, we will go through the various methods that are used to separate the various mixtures obtained from the Earth.

Chemical Nomenclature for Inorganic Compounds

7. Chemical Nomenclature for Inorganic Compounds

Naming inorganic compounds can seem like a monumental task, but if you learn some basic rules it isn't so difficult. This lesson will go over naming binary molecular compounds, ionic compounds, oxyanions and acids.

What is an Uncombined Element? - Definition & Reactivity

8. What is an Uncombined Element? - Definition & Reactivity

Elements are a lot like people. Some like to be alone, others like to live in groups. This lesson will examine uncombined elements, or elements that are not reactive, and why they are so.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support