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Ch 2: Overview of the U.S. Legal System

About This Chapter

In this chapter, you'll review a collection of lessons that explore concepts related to the U.S. legal system. Watch the chapter's lessons whenever you need to study these topics for an upcoming exam, research paper, class project or homework assignment.

Overview of the U.S. Legal System - Chapter Summary

Check out this comprehensive chapter to review the major aspects of the U.S. legal system. As you progress through these short and engaging lessons, you'll study the organization of U.S. court systems at the state and federal levels. The chapter was designed with simplicity and flexibility in mind, which is why we made it accessible on any computer or mobile device. To make sure you fully understand these legal concepts, simply take the included lesson quizzes and chapter exam. When you're finished, you should be able to:

  • Explain the concept of dual federalism
  • Interpret the supremacy clause
  • Describe the structure of the U.S. federal and state court systems
  • Define concept of the burden of proof

8 Lessons in Chapter 2: Overview of the U.S. Legal System
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Dual Federalism? - Definition & Examples

1. What is Dual Federalism? - Definition & Examples

A federal system divides authority between two levels, state and national--but who gets to do what? And how do we know? One doctrine, known as dual federalism, aims for a simple answer, but tends to find complexities.

The Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

2. The Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

This lesson will cover the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, which states that if a federal law and a state law come into conflict with one another, the federal law will take priority over the state law.

The State Court System of the United States: Definition & Structure

3. The State Court System of the United States: Definition & Structure

The United States has two separate court systems: the federal and the state. Each state has its own set of state courts. This lesson explains state courts, including the structure and jurisdiction of state court systems.

The Federal Court System of the United States: Definition, Structure & Levels

4. The Federal Court System of the United States: Definition, Structure & Levels

The United States has two separate court systems: the federal and the state. This lesson explores the federal court system of the Unites States, including its structure and jurisdiction.

The Court System: Trial, Appellate & Supreme Court

5. The Court System: Trial, Appellate & Supreme Court

There are three separate levels of courts in our legal system, each serving a different function. Trial courts settle disputes as the first court of instance, appellate courts review cases moved up from trial courts and supreme courts hear cases of national importance or those appealed in the court of appeals.

Criminal Procedure Rules: Definition, Laws & Examples

6. Criminal Procedure Rules: Definition, Laws & Examples

In this lesson, you will be introduced to rules of criminal procedure. This lesson also covers the administration of criminal justice and provides examples of the application of the laws of criminal procedure.

Burden of Proof: Definition & Cases

7. Burden of Proof: Definition & Cases

Burden of proof refers to a party's duty in a criminal or civil trial to prove that a claim is true. This lesson introduces the general concept of a burden of proof, and discusses the related legal standards and Supreme Court cases.

Standard of Proof in Law: Definition & Cases

8. Standard of Proof in Law: Definition & Cases

Standard of proof refers to the amount of evidence required to prove a legal claim or assertion. This lesson will introduce you to the different standards of proof and some of the cases associated with those standards.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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