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Ch 2: PARCC ELA - Grade 11: Evaluating Arguments

About This Chapter

Let us help you improve your ability to evaluate arguments. We have created an engaging chapter that will allow you to adequately prepare for the PARCC ELA - Grade 11 exam.

PARCC ELA - Grade 11: Evaluating Arguments - Chapter Summary

The key topic discussed in these helpful lessons is analyzing arguments. Become familiar with related subjects before you take the PARCC ELA - Grade 11 exam. After going through all of the lessons, you will have a better understanding of:

  • Parts of an argument
  • An argument vs. topic in a passage
  • Presenting arguments
  • Evaluating reasoning
  • Structuring an argument
  • Logical fallacies

If you learn and pick up skills from these lessons, you will be prepared to answer any type of relevant question that will be on this exam. Equipped with different skills, you can perform at your best.

PARCC ELA - Grade 11: Evaluating Arguments Chapter Objectives

In order to assess your writing and reading skills, you will need to take the PARCC ELA Grade 11 exam. It was created to help you prepare for college and careers. Multiple-choice questions are on the exam, which will assess your ability to evaluate arguments.

Topics in this interactive chapter will be addressed on the ELA portion of the exam. By going over each lesson multiple times and utilizing the self-assessment quizzes, your knowledge of the subject will be much greater.

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: PARCC ELA - Grade 11: Evaluating Arguments
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

1. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

Topic vs. Argument in a Reading Passage

2. Topic vs. Argument in a Reading Passage

Understanding the distinction between topic and argument is an important part of becoming a critical reader. Here's the difference, with examples. Also review how to identify the support for an argument in a passage.

Different Ways of Presenting an Argument

3. Different Ways of Presenting an Argument

Structure is essential for any type of communication. This lesson discusses the strategies one can use for structuring writing in order to present a strong argument.

How to Evaluate Reasoning

4. How to Evaluate Reasoning

Evaluating reasoning in an essay or article is an important step in critical analysis. Being able to judge if something is reasonable whether or not you agree with the argument will be our learning focus for this video.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

5. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

6. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

7. Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

Watch this video lesson to see examples of the logical fallacies of appeals to ignorance, emotion, and popularity. You will also see how to identify them.

Logical Fallacies: Hasty Generalization, Circular Reasoning, False Cause & Limited Choice

8. Logical Fallacies: Hasty Generalization, Circular Reasoning, False Cause & Limited Choice

Watch this video lesson to see how you can identify cases where logic is not sound. Learn the characteristic traits of hasty generalization, circular reasoning, false cause, and limited choice.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

9. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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