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Ch 13: Philosophy and Nonfiction: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Philosophy and Nonfiction chapter of this Introduction to Humanities Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the connection between philosophy and nonfiction. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of philosophy and nonfiction.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering introductory humanities material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn humanities. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the connection between nonfiction and philosophy or relevant writers
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning humanities (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about philosophy and nonfiction
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra humanities learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Philosophy and Nonfiction chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Philosophy and Nonfiction chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any philosophy-related nonfiction question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a philosophy and nonfiction unit of a standard introductory humanities course. Topics covered include:

  • Philip Sidney's essay about poetry
  • John Stuart Mill's major philosophy
  • Victorian era thought and criticism
  • Sermons from the Great Awakening
  • The life and quotes of Benjamin Franklin
  • Thomas Paine's influence on the Revolutionary War
  • Francis Bacon's ideas and legacy.

17 Lessons in Chapter 13: Philosophy and Nonfiction: Help and Review
Philip Sidney and the Defense of Poesy

1. Philip Sidney and the Defense of Poesy

Sir Philip Sidney: courtier, soldier, governor, poet and critic. Learn all about this multifaceted Elizabethan celebrity and his massive effect on the worlds of poetry and literary scholarship.

John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism, Quotes and Theory

2. John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism, Quotes and Theory

Join us for this analysis of nineteenth century British philosopher John Stuart Mill, whose radical political and ethical ideas based in utilitarianism have had a profound effect in the final frontier and on our current political landscape.

Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin:  Politics and Essays

3. Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin: Politics and Essays

Meet THE power couple of the 1790s: Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin. Watch how Wollstonecraft inspires the feminist movement, and thrill to Godwin's early anarchic ways! Plus: how does one betray the other, even after death?

John Ruskin: Victorian Thought and Criticism

4. John Ruskin: Victorian Thought and Criticism

From his beginnings as a poet and painter to his status as one of Victorian England's foremost social critics, learn all about John Ruskin's influence on the worlds of art and economic structure.

Jonathan Edwards and the Great Awakening: Sermons & Biography

5. Jonathan Edwards and the Great Awakening: Sermons & Biography

Jonathan Edwards was an American minister whose sermon 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God' became one of the most famous sermons of the 18th century. In this lesson, we'll look at Edwards' sermon and analyze it for Puritan beliefs and style.

Benjamin Franklin: Quotes and Autobiography

6. Benjamin Franklin: Quotes and Autobiography

Everyone knows Benjamin Franklin flew a kite in a storm and that he signed the Declaration of Independence. But how much do you know about his writing? In this lesson, we'll look at two of his most famous works and how they influenced American literature.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense and The Crisis

7. Thomas Paine: Common Sense and The Crisis

Thomas Paine was an influential writer during the American Revolution. In this lesson, we'll explore the content and style of two of his most famous pamphlets and how they helped shape American history.

Francis Bacon: History, Ideas and Legacy

8. Francis Bacon: History, Ideas and Legacy

This lesson examines the contributions of Sir Francis Bacon to science. We take a long hard look at the scientific method, with special emphasis on experimental science. Then we briefly examine how Bacon sold science to the world.

The Three Laws of Logic

9. The Three Laws of Logic

In this lesson we will discuss the three laws of logic. Learn about each of the three laws, what they mean, and how they apply to rational thinking. Then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Base Rate Fallacy: Definition & Example

10. Base Rate Fallacy: Definition & Example

Why do most people think that if you flip a coin a few times, getting a string of heads is less likely than any other particular combination of heads and tails? In this lesson, you will find out how this and other examples of base rate fallacy occur.

Noam Chomsky's Theories on Language

11. Noam Chomsky's Theories on Language

In this lesson, you will learn about the key theories of language development put forth by Noam Chomsky. Following this lesson, you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge with a short quiz.

What is Metaphysics? -Definition & Examples

12. What is Metaphysics? -Definition & Examples

In this lesson we willl be exploring metaphysics, which is a wide-ranging topic covering a lot of philosophical questions about the universe and our place in it.

Nietzsche's Perspectivism: Definition & Overview

13. Nietzsche's Perspectivism: Definition & Overview

This lesson will explain the concept of perspectivism and how it fits into Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy. Nietzsche's understanding of truth, morality, and cultural values will be explained and considered.

Informational Writing: Types & Samples

14. Informational Writing: Types & Samples

In this lesson, we will define informational writing, examine the purpose of this type of writing and explore the features of different kinds of informational texts.

The American Transcendentalists: Values & Explanation

15. The American Transcendentalists: Values & Explanation

In this lesson, we will read and learn about the American Transcendentalist movement, focusing on its origin and core values. We will also conduct a brief passage analysis, before concluding the lesson with a quiz.

The Antichrist by Nietzsche: Summary & Analysis

16. The Antichrist by Nietzsche: Summary & Analysis

'The AntiChrist' by Nietzsche is a deep exploration of symbolism and a repudiation of Christianity. Through this novel, the author sought to destroy religious beliefs and archetypes. Learn what these are in this lesson, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

The Birth of Tragedy by Nietzsche: Summary & Analysis

17. The Birth of Tragedy by Nietzsche: Summary & Analysis

This lesson covers 'The Birth of Tragedy,' Friedrich Nietzsche's first published book. Read a summary of this important early work by one of the most controversial philosophers of modern times. Then, take a quiz to test your comprehension.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Introduction to Humanities: Help and Review course

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