Ch 11: Physical & Chemical Properties of Earth's Minerals

About This Chapter

Use this chapter's video lessons to study physical and chemical properties of minerals, including average atomic mass, ionic and covalent compounds, and the periodic table. You'll also find lessons covering the types of radioactive decay.

Physical & Chemical Properties of Earth's Minerals - Chapter Summary

This chapter uses short video lessons to help you study the properties of minerals. Get a quick review of the subatomic particles represented by an element's atomic number and average atomic mass. You'll also study the properties of ionic and covalent compounds' chemical bonds as well as common traits among groups and periods in the periodic table. If you need to revisit the differences between alpha, beta, and gamma decay, you'll find lessons on these topics as well. A short video explaining methods for calculating radioactive decay rounds out the chapter. Topics of instruction include:

  • Isotopes
  • Average atomic mass
  • Ionic compounds
  • Covalent compounds
  • The periodic table
  • Radioactive decay

Study the earth science topics you want to review with short videos featuring tags that allow you to navigate directly to the main points in each lesson. You can also scan the transcripts, which include key terms in bold print. When you're ready to test your understanding of these concepts, take the multiple-choice lesson and chapter quizzes to get some feedback on your progress.

7 Lessons in Chapter 11: Physical & Chemical Properties of Earth's Minerals
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Atomic Number and Mass Number

1. Atomic Number and Mass Number

Atoms are the basic building blocks of everything around you. In order to really understand how atoms combine to form molecules, it's necessary to be familiar with their structure. In this lesson, we'll dissect atoms so we can see just what really goes into those little building blocks of matter.

Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

2. Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

When you drink a glass of water, you are actually drinking a combination of heavy water and light water. What's the difference? Is it harmful? This video will explain the difference between the two types of water and go into detail on the significance of the different isotopes of elements.

Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

3. Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

In this lesson, you'll learn about ionic compounds and how they form. Additionally, you'll learn the properties of ionic compounds, such as their high melting and boiling points, their ability to conduct electricity, and the fact that they form crystals.

Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

4. Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

Learn about covalent bonds, how covalent compounds are formed and the properties inherent to covalent compounds, such as low melting and boiling points, in this lesson. Also, learn what rules to follow to name simple covalent compounds.

The Periodic Table: Properties of Groups and Periods

5. The Periodic Table: Properties of Groups and Periods

How is the periodic table like the map you used on your last road trip? In this lesson, you will be introduced to the periodic table, the road map of chemists. We will discuss how the elements are organized and how you can use this organization to identify some of their major physical properties.

Types of Radioactive Decay and Their Effect on the Nucleus

6. Types of Radioactive Decay and Their Effect on the Nucleus

What is meant by the term 'radioactive'? In this lesson we will break down the three main types of nuclear decay particles and discuss their composition, their effect on the nucleus, and their applications.

Half-life: Calculating Radioactive Decay and Interpreting Decay Graphs

7. Half-life: Calculating Radioactive Decay and Interpreting Decay Graphs

What causes a radioactive particle to decay? We'll never really know, but our best guess lies in probability. In this lesson, we are going to focus on the half-life, a way of measuring the probability that a particle will react.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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