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Ch 2: Physical Evidence & Crime Scene Reconstruction

About This Chapter

We want to help you get ready to take an important exam with the help of this chapter on physical evidence and crime scene reconstruction. You can build confidence ahead of test day by studying our video and text lessons and taking the quizzes provided here.

Physical Evidence & Crime Scene Reconstruction - Chapter Summary

You don't need to worry about comprehending physical evidence and crime scene reconstruction with this easy-to-follow and professionally designed chapter. Our short, mobile-friendly lessons clearly explain the components of a crime scene, the steps of preliminary investigation, the importance of the chain of custody, plus additional evidence collection topics. The video lessons are generally less than ten minutes long and easy to navigate using the video tabs feature. Please submit any questions you have to one of our instructors through the Dashboard. Once you complete these lessons, you should understand how to:

  • Explain the preliminary investigation process and chain of custody procedures
  • Describe the laws that apply to physical evidence
  • Outline different types of physical and forensic evidence
  • Give examples of circumstantial evidence
  • Define real evidence in law
  • Detail the uses for crime scene reconstruction
  • Discuss the procedures used to record and preserve evidence
  • Explain the purpose and process of trace metal detection
  • Identify the preservation and collection of paint and glass as forensic evidence
  • Describe the testing used in forensic soil analysis

13 Lessons in Chapter 2: Physical Evidence & Crime Scene Reconstruction
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Crime Scene: Definition & Components

1. Crime Scene: Definition & Components

In this lesson, we will discuss what constitutes a crime scene and how law enforcement officials go about investigating one. Information about securing crime scenes and which individuals have access to them will be included.

Preliminary Investigation: Definition, Steps, Analysis & Example

2. Preliminary Investigation: Definition, Steps, Analysis & Example

Discover what a preliminary investigation is. Review the definition and look at the steps involved in this type of law enforcement investigation. Examine the preliminary investigation process and gain insight through analysis and an example.

What is the Chain of Custody? - Definition, Procedures & Importance

3. What is the Chain of Custody? - Definition, Procedures & Importance

When police officers collect evidence, that evidence has to be stored and protected. But how do they do this? This lesson will explain what chain of custody is, how it's created, and why it is so important.

Physical Evidence: Definition, Types & Law

4. Physical Evidence: Definition, Types & Law

Evidence at a crime scene that is tangible is considered physical evidence. This lesson discusses physical evidence, the varieties of evidence, and how it pertains to the law.

Forensic Evidence: Types, Definition & Cases

5. Forensic Evidence: Types, Definition & Cases

The term 'forensic' actually means relating to law and science. In this lesson, we'll review different types of forensic evidence. We'll also look at real world cases where forensic evidence was used to solve crimes.

Circumstantial Evidence: Definition, Types & Examples

6. Circumstantial Evidence: Definition, Types & Examples

For years, civil and criminal cases have been won or lost based on circumstantial evidence. Learn more about the definition of this term and common types of circumstantial evidence, looking at specific examples.

Real Evidence in Law: Definition & Types

7. Real Evidence in Law: Definition & Types

Real evidence describes any physical object that has a direct connection to a crime or civil action. This lesson will introduce you to some examples of real evidence and explain how real evidence is used in trials.

Crime Scene Reconstruction: Definition & Uses

8. Crime Scene Reconstruction: Definition & Uses

Crime scene reconstruction is an analysis of the physical evidence and circumstances of a crime, theorizing how it occurred, and the scientific testing of that theory. This lesson is about crime scene reconstruction, its uses, and its definition.

Recording & Preserving Evidence: Methods & Procedures

9. Recording & Preserving Evidence: Methods & Procedures

This lesson teaches the fundamentals and general ideas behind recording, preserving, and properly cataloging evidence that is found and recovered from a crime scene.

Trace Metal Detection: Process & Purpose

10. Trace Metal Detection: Process & Purpose

The detection of trace metal evidence is an important forensic tool available to law enforcement officers. This lesson provides an overview of the purpose of trace metal detection and the process that is used to collect this evidence.

Paint as Forensic Evidence: Purpose, Collection & Preservation

11. Paint as Forensic Evidence: Purpose, Collection & Preservation

Paint can be important evidence in criminal investigations. This lesson will review the significance of paint as forensic evidence and discuss how it can be collected and preserved for forensic examination.

Glass as Forensic Evidence: Purpose, Collection & Preservation

12. Glass as Forensic Evidence: Purpose, Collection & Preservation

Broken glass is often found at crime scenes and can be used as forensic evidence. This lesson is about the purpose of collecting glass as forensic evidence, the collection process, and its preservation.

Forensic Soil Analysis: Evidence & Testing

13. Forensic Soil Analysis: Evidence & Testing

This lesson gives a brief synopsis of the ways by which soil can be collected, preserved, and tested in criminal cases. You'll learn about sample collection techniques, tools, containers that are used, and much more.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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