Ch 23: PLACE Elementary Education: US History (1877-1945)

About This Chapter

Review late 19th century to mid-20th century U.S. history using our video lessons and quizzes. Knowledge of this time period is needed when taking the Program for Licensing Assessments for Colorado Educators (PLACE) Elementary Education exam.

PLACE Elementary Education: U.S. History (1877-1945) - Chapter Summary

The lessons comprising this chapter focus on events in U.S. history from the end of the Reconstruction Period to the end of World War II. You will learn about wars, industrial development, politics, legislation and domestic policies marking this era. A review of this material typically results in the ability to and successfully answering these types of questions on the PLACE Elementary Education exam by demonstrating the following:

  • Reflecting on the successes and failures of the Reconstruction Period
  • Discussing details about the Second Industrial Revolution
  • Describing Gilded Age politics
  • Understanding the development of federal regulations on industry
  • Defining American Imperialism
  • Summarizing causes and events of the Spanish-American War and World War I
  • Relating information about Prohibition
  • Noting events that led to and marked the period known as the Great Depression
  • Identifying facts about World War II, such as causes, the Holocaust and the dropping of the atom bomb

Instructors guide you through these lessons with brief descriptions and definitions supported by illustrations and examples. Before you take the PLACE Elementary Education exam, you can use our self-assessment quizzes to measure what you have learned and find out if there are topics you need to further review.

PLACE Elementary Education: U.S. History (1877-1945) - Chapter Objectives

The U.S. History (1877-1945) chapter is designed to help you refresh your memory on specific historical facts during this time period that you will be tested on when taking the PLACE Elementary Education exam. Questions about U.S. history are found in the Social Studies subtest of this paper-based exam.

PLACE exams are required for educators seeking licensure in the state of Colorado. Those intending to pursue licensure as an elementary school teacher must take the Elementary Education exam. This exam tests one's knowledge of and ability to teach literacy/language arts, math, humanities, wellness and physical education, social studies and science. The passing score for this and all PLACE exams is 220.

15 Lessons in Chapter 23: PLACE Elementary Education: US History (1877-1945)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

1. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

2. American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

American industry was transformed in the Second Industrial Revolution but not just through mechanization. Find out how new methods of management and organization helped the development of big business.

Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

3. Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

Refresh your memory of the 'Forgotten Presidents' of the Gilded Age, and learn how Civil Service Reform might have cleaned up the federal government, but not the cities and states. They were the domain of political machines, like Tammany Hall.

Theodore Roosevelt & the Progressives: Definition and Political Agenda

4. Theodore Roosevelt & the Progressives: Definition and Political Agenda

In the early 20th century, the United States had become an increasingly industrialized society. Progressive reformers believed that many social, economic and political issues required federal government regulation. Learn how Progressive Era reformers, including President Theodore Roosevelt and his Square Deal, worked to correct problems that accompanied this rapid development and expansion.

American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

5. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

6. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

7. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

8. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

9. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

Prohibition of the 1920s: Definition, 18th Amendment & Results

10. Prohibition of the 1920s: Definition, 18th Amendment & Results

The 18th Amendment outlawed all alcohol in the United States. The prohibition era defined a decade and the people of a modernizing America. In this lesson, develop an understanding of prohibition and the 18th Amendment.

The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

11. The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression in the United States. Learn about this event, including the factors that contributed to the collapse of the American economy.

World War II: The Start of the Second World War

12. World War II: The Start of the Second World War

Learn all about the start of World War II and why the League of Nations could not stop aggression by Italy, Germany and Japan in the 1930s, which led to the outbreak of this second global conflict.

The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

13. The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

On December 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan launched a surprise attack against Allied possessions in the Pacific, including the American military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. After decades of conflict between the two nations, the U.S. declared war.

The Holocaust: Anti-Semitism and Genocide in Nazi Germany

14. The Holocaust: Anti-Semitism and Genocide in Nazi Germany

The Holocaust was the persecution and mass murder of as many as 11 million people by Adolf Hitler and the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. Learn about the people they targeted, the progression of events leading up to the Final Solution and the end of the genocide in this lesson.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: How the Atomic Bomb Changed Warfare During WWII

15. Hiroshima and Nagasaki: How the Atomic Bomb Changed Warfare During WWII

As America and its WWII allies considered invading Japan, the Manhattan Project successfully developed an atomic weapon. Its use on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, precipitated VJ Day, the end of the Pacific war, on August 14, 1945.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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