Ch 3: PLACE English: Literary Terms & Analysis

About This Chapter

Learn about the literary terms and analysis strategies you'll be asked about on the PLACE English exam. These informative video lessons and interactive quizzes help you quickly and easily review important topics.

PLACE English: Literary Terms & Analysis - Chapter Summary

The topics in this chapter focus on literary terms and ways to analyze literature, with lessons on author's purpose, point of view, finding cause and effect in stories, and more. These video lessons help prepare you for reading questions on the PLACE English exam. By the end of the chapter, you should be proficient in the following:

  • Analyzing literary passages and informational texts
  • Finding the theme or implied main idea of a reading selection
  • Types of narrators
  • Comparing and contrasting
  • Evaluating reasoning
  • Difference between deductive and inductive reasoning
  • Inferring meaning

Each lesson is between five and ten minutes long and features an interactive timeline that allows you to quickly skip to the topics you want to review. Lessons are accessible from any device, so you can study on your laptop, phone or tablet whenever and wherever you like.

PLACE English: Literary Terms & Analysis Chapter Objectives

The PLACE English exam is a requirement for those seeking certification as a Colorado English teacher. The test consists of around 100 multiple-choice questions that focus on literature, reading and communications. The lessons in this chapter on literary terms and analysis will help you prepare for the reading section of the exam, which measures your ability to understand strategies for interpreting and comprehending reading materials. The test questions may ask you to evaluate implied information, draw conclusions from what you read, understand literary techniques and know methods for monitoring student comprehension of reading texts.

15 Lessons in Chapter 3: PLACE English: Literary Terms & Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

2. Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

In this lesson, we examine several of the most common structures that an informational text might use and the different ways each structure helps an author create an argument or deliver their message.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

3. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

4. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

Listening for the Main Point

5. Listening for the Main Point

In this lesson, you'll get some tips on listening to a passage of spoken English for the main point. Don't get bogged down in the details; focus on what's really important!

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

6. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

7. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

8. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Comparing and Contrasting: Examples & Concept

9. Comparing and Contrasting: Examples & Concept

Learn about the development strategy of comparing and contrasting, and how to apply it in an essay. Review the examples, and then take a quiz to test your new knowledge.

Comparing an Original Story to Its Film Version

10. Comparing an Original Story to Its Film Version

In this lesson we compare a book to its film version and discuss several things to examine and consider when rendering the comparison and examine To Kill a Mockingbird.

Comparing & Contrasting a Fictional Portrayal to Historical Accounts

11. Comparing & Contrasting a Fictional Portrayal to Historical Accounts

Many novels take events or people from history and treat them in a fictional manner. The author may make significant changes to the historical facts, but in doing so it can give the reader a deeper understanding of history.

How to Find Cause and Effect in a Reading Selection

12. How to Find Cause and Effect in a Reading Selection

Cause and effect structures can be used to describe how an action takes place. This lesson will discuss how to find this structure within a reading selection.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

13. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

14. The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

Inductive and deductive reasoning are often confused. This lesson introduces the concept of reasoning and gives you tips and tricks to keeping inductive and deductive reasoning straight.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

15. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the PLACE English: Practice & Study Guide course

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