Ch 9: Planning to Communicate in the Workplace

About This Chapter

Watch video lessons and take self-assessment quizzes to learn how to plan effective communication in the workplace. These video lessons are short and engaging and make learning easy!

Planning to Communicate in the Workplace - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Communication that 'just happens' may not be as effective as it could be with some prior planning. In this chapter, our instructors will show you how to analyze those receiving your messages to choose the most appropriate method of communication. You can also learn how solid research can be used as back-up for messages sent. After you've worked your way through these lessons, you should be able to accomplish the following:

  • Choose the most effective modes of communication for given situations
  • Offer support for messages through effective research
  • Locate appropriate materials for research
  • Gather information through interviews and surveys
  • Draw conclusions based on research

Video Objectives
Determining the Purpose of Your Message: Inform, Persuade & Good Will Explore whether a message is meant to persuade, inform or spread good will.
Analyzing Your Audience and Adapting Your Message: Purpose, Process & Strategies Explain how to adapt messages to the intended purposes.
Choosing Your Channel of Communication: Oral, Written, Visual & Electronic Discuss the factors to consider when choosing written, oral, electronic or visual communication.
Supporting Your Message With Primary and Secondary Research Compare and contrast primary and secondary research.
Assessing the Reliability, Validity, Credibility, and Worth of Sources Explore the importance of determining sources' validity, reliability, worth and credibility.
Tips for Locating Research Materials Outline how to perform research in books, journals and periodicals, as well as online.
Conducting Surveys and Interviews: Explanation & Purpose Address methods for conducting interviews and surveys to be used as research.
Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing Your Research Explain when words used for workplace communication might be paraphrased, summarized or quoted.
Analyzing, Applying, and Drawing Conclusions From Research to Make Recommendations Discuss how to make recommendations in workplace communication based on analysis, application and drawing conclusions.

9 Lessons in Chapter 9: Planning to Communicate in the Workplace
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Determining the Purpose of Your Message: Inform, Persuade & Good Will

1. Determining the Purpose of Your Message: Inform, Persuade & Good Will

Determining the purpose of your message is the first step in deciding what you want to say and how you want to say it. It is essential to choose whether to inform, persuade or offer goodwill via a message in the workplace.

Analyzing Your Audience and Adapting Your Message: Purpose, Process & Strategy

2. Analyzing Your Audience and Adapting Your Message: Purpose, Process & Strategy

In order for a message to be effective, it has to be impactful, clear and relatable to an audience. Learn about some key steps to analyzing an audience in order to identity the correct way to deliver and write a message.

Choosing Your Channel of Communication: Oral, Written, Visual & Electronic

3. Choosing Your Channel of Communication: Oral, Written, Visual & Electronic

Sometimes how you deliver information is just as important as what information you deliver to an audience. It is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages to the four different types of communication channels: oral, written, visual and electronic.

Supporting Your Message With Primary and Secondary Research

4. Supporting Your Message With Primary and Secondary Research

An individual's ability to support messages with primary and secondary research for business communication is a much needed skill. There are some key differences between primary and secondary research and how the information can be acquired, utilized, and help create an effective message.

Assessing the Reliability and Validity of Sources

5. Assessing the Reliability and Validity of Sources

In the business world, any research material must have support that can provide validity and reliability. The support must be credible and have documentation to show that it is well-researched, professional, peer-reviewed and recent.

Tips for Locating Research Materials

6. Tips for Locating Research Materials

The process of preparing a research paper for academic or employment purposes can be a difficult task. There are some basic tips for how to locate research materials such as online, books, periodicals, etc.

Conducting Surveys and Interviews: Explanation & Purpose

7. Conducting Surveys and Interviews: Explanation & Purpose

Conducting surveys and interviews can help many companies solve business problems by the creation of helpful primary data. Qualitative data is meaningful as it allows more detailed opinions, observations and information that allow better insight into making the best decisions.

Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing Your Research

8. Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing Your Research

Quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing are three important skills to master for writing in the academic and business world. These skills will help support claims and add credibility to your work.

Analyzing, Applying, and Drawing Conclusions From Research to Make Recommendations

9. Analyzing, Applying, and Drawing Conclusions From Research to Make Recommendations

In this lesson, we'll explore how companies analyze, apply and draw conclusions from research to solve problems. Learn how effective recommendations can help a business survive and thrive.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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