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Ch 24: Population Evolution

About This Chapter

Investigate the causes and implications of population evolution in these informative lessons. Use the brief quizzes and chapter exam to test your knowledge of the concepts explored in this chapter.

Population Evolution - Chapter Summary

Populations of most species evolve over time to adapt to environmental and biological changes. Discover what genetic and ecological factors initiate evolutionary changes among species populations in these brief but engaging lessons. This chapter also explores how to use the Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium equation to determine if a species population is or is not in equilibrium and/or changing. Additionally, you can use this chapter to further investigate:

  • Microevolution causes such as natural selection, gene flow and genetic drift
  • The necessity of gene pool diversity for a species' survival
  • Biological influences on mating selection and male competition
  • Benefits of adaptation when organisms are faced with environmental changes

Once you've thoroughly reviewed the concepts featured in this chapter, utilize the lesson quizzes and chapter exam to assess your comprehension of the material. Each quiz contains embedded links that take you directly to specific topics within the lesson so you can quickly and easily review only the information you need to. You can also print the quiz worksheets and full transcripts for any of the video lessons for hard-copy study material. Expert instructors are also available to answer any questions you may have on the material.

7 Lessons in Chapter 24: Population Evolution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of Microevolution: Natural Selection, Gene Flow & Genetic Drift

1. Causes of Microevolution: Natural Selection, Gene Flow & Genetic Drift

Environments are dynamic, which causes populations to be as well. In this lesson, you'll learn about microevolution, as well as the mechanisms behind it that cause changes in allele frequencies within populations.

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium I: Overview

2. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium I: Overview

In this lesson, we'll examine population genetics in greater detail. We'll also explore notions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for large, stable populations. Is the genetic makeup of our flying hamster population changing? The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can serve as a reference point as we try to answer population genetics questions.

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium II: The Equation

3. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium II: The Equation

The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium equation is represented by a polynomial, so we'll have to do some calculations. Don't be intimidated; a few coin tosses can help us make sense of allelic frequencies in a given gene pool.

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium III: Evolutionary Agents

4. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium III: Evolutionary Agents

In this lesson, you'll learn how the Hardy-Weinberg equation relates to different evolutionary agents and population changes. Discover how the equation may be used to discover populations that are not in equilibrium.

How Gene Pool Diversity Affects a Group's Survival Potential

5. How Gene Pool Diversity Affects a Group's Survival Potential

Humans are genetically the same yet very different. These differences are important, not just for humans but for all species because it makes it possible for populations to adapt to changing environmental conditions, which is essential to their survival.

Animal Mating Systems, Mate Choice, Sexual Selection & Male Competition

6. Animal Mating Systems, Mate Choice, Sexual Selection & Male Competition

Choosing a mate is the single most important thing that most animals will do for the continuation of their species. In this lesson, we look at what goes into mate selection, as well as how that biology may influence who we fall for.

Environmental Changes & Adaptation in Organisms

7. Environmental Changes & Adaptation in Organisms

In this lesson, we will discuss what happens when an organism is forced to deal with environmental changes. You will learn what adaptation is and how organisms benefit from it.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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