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Ch 16: Praxis Biology: Biology Lab Techniques

About This Chapter

Explore biology lab techniques with our video lessons and quizzes. You can get ready to demonstrate the competencies of a secondary biology teacher on the Praxis II Biology Content Knowledge exam by working your way through the lessons in this chapter.

Praxis Biology: Biology Lab Techniques - Chapter Summary

Who was Frederick Sanger, and what type of innovative analysis did he develop? You can answer that question, and more, with the lessons in this chapter. Start preparing for your Praxis II test by reviewing the genetic engineering methods scientists use to make human insulin. Next, you can revisit the foundational aspects of plasmids, including multiple cloning sites, selectable markers and origins of replication. Study all the following concepts to prepare for the Praxis II Biology Content Knowledge exam:

  • The use of microscopes in biology research
  • The study of biological processes with the aid of spectrophotometry
  • The use of ligase in recombinant DNA engineering
  • Genetic engineering
  • DNA plasmids
  • Transformation of bacteria
  • Polymerase chain reactions
  • DNA sequencing with the Sanger method

You can experience the lessons through video, written transcript or both. Many lessons include links for additional text lessons covering related topics. Use the lessons as many times as you wish, and you can use the handy video tags to go back to specific portions for extra review.

Praxis Biology: Biology Lab Techniques Objectives

You should expect to answer approximately 38 questions pertinent to the topics outlined above on your Praxis II Biology Content Knowledge exam. About 12 additional questions pertaining to scientific inquiry in general may also apply. Together, those multiple-choice questions compose about 32% of the entire test. Make sure that you understand how DNA research contributes to genetic engineering, reviewing such topics as sequencing and transgenic cells, to be prepared for test day.

Our multiple-choice quizzes offer beneficial practice in the types of questions you might encounter on the Praxis. Your success on the test demonstrates not only your knowledge level, but also your readiness to teach secondary-level biology students.

13 Lessons in Chapter 16: Praxis Biology: Biology Lab Techniques
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Use Spectrophotometry to Understand Beer's Law

1. How to Use Spectrophotometry to Understand Beer's Law

When demonstrating Beer's law of light absorbance and solution-concentration, spectrophotometry can be used to identify the amount of a given compound. Learn how this is demonstrated, and how it calculates concentration and molar absorptivity.

How Ligase is Used to Engineer Recombinant DNA

2. How Ligase is Used to Engineer Recombinant DNA

In relation to recombinant DNA engineering, DNA ligase conjoins two DNA molecules while restriction enzymes cut DNA molecules. Explore how DNA ligase and restriction enzymes work together to facilitate recombinant DNA technology.

What is Genetic Engineering? - Definition and Examples

3. What is Genetic Engineering? - Definition and Examples

Genetic engineering involves modifying a host organism's genetic makeup by using vectors as a transfer agent. Understand the definition and examples of the process, as well as the difference between transgenic and genetically modified organisms.

What is a DNA Plasmid? - Importance to Genetic Engineering

4. What is a DNA Plasmid? - Importance to Genetic Engineering

DNA plasmid is a vital component of genetic engineering. Learn about DNA plasmids and the three characteristics, including multiple cloning sites, replication origin, and selectable markers, that make DNA plasmids so important in genetic engineering.

Restriction Enzymes: Function and Definition

5. Restriction Enzymes: Function and Definition

Understand how restriction enzymes function. Learn about genetic engineering, the definition of a restriction enzyme, the recognition sequence, the palindromic sequence, and the sticky ends of single-strand DNA.

What is Agarose Gel Electrophoresis?

6. What is Agarose Gel Electrophoresis?

Gel electrophoresis uses an electrical current to separate biological molecules based on size. Discover concepts like genetic engineering, gel electrophoresis, and agarose.

Ethidium Bromide, Loading Buffer & DNA Ladder: Visualizing DNA and Determining its Size

7. Ethidium Bromide, Loading Buffer & DNA Ladder: Visualizing DNA and Determining its Size

Ethidium bromide, loading buffers, and DNA ladders play a key role in visualizing DNA and determining its size. Explore the importance of these elements in agarose gel electrophoresis - a method that separates biological molecules using electricity.

Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Equipment & Procedure

8. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Equipment & Procedure

Agarose gel electrophoresis is a laboratory procedure that uses an electrical current to separate biological molecules. Explore this procedure and learn about the equipment required to perform it, including a gel box, power supply, loading buffer, dye front, ethidium bromide, and UV box.

Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Results Analysis

9. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Results Analysis

Learn to analyze and interpret the results of an agarose gel electrophoresis. Explore how this lab procedure is used to analyze and troubleshoot the results of restriction digestion or a ligation step in an experiment.

Bacterial Transformation: Antibiotic Selection and Positive & Negative Controls

10. Bacterial Transformation: Antibiotic Selection and Positive & Negative Controls

Scientists conduct carefully designed experiments to form hypotheses and replicate their findings in order to verify them. Learn about bacterial transformation and discover how it uses antibiotic selection and positive and negative controls to identify bacteria that can produce repeatable results.

PCR: Reagents Used in Polymerase Chain Reaction

11. PCR: Reagents Used in Polymerase Chain Reaction

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a procedure that creates copies of DNA using reagents. DNA is amplified, and the amplified DNA regions are identified by other DNA pieces using reagents, such as template DNA and PCR primers, and other key parts of DNA, including nucleotides and tag polymerases. Learn about that process, including the different elements that makes conditions optimal for PCR to occur.

PCR: Steps Involved in Polymerase Chain Reaction

12. PCR: Steps Involved in Polymerase Chain Reaction

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a laboratory procedure that can create replicas of DNA. Explore the three steps of this revolutionary process: denaturation, annealing, and extension.

The Sanger Method of DNA Sequencing

13. The Sanger Method of DNA Sequencing

The Sanger Method of DNA sequencing uses dideoxynucleotides to determine DNA sequencing. Explore the dideoxynucleotide structure, chain terminators, and how to interpret Sanger sequencing in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Praxis Biology: Biology Lab Techniques.

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