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Ch 4: Praxis I Writing: Writing Arguments

About This Chapter

This Praxis Writing prep chapter covers how to write a well-structured argumentative essay. You'll find all the tools needed to craft an engaging essay in a short timeframe and low-stress manner.

Praxis I Writing: Writing Arguments - Chapter Summary

Writing a solid argumentative essay includes both a well-structured argument and language use that is clear and coherent. The content of this chapter covers the necessary components of argumentative essay writing and can help you prepare for the Praxis Writing test. By the end of this chapter you should be able to:

  • Explain how to engage readers by choosing and developing an appeal
  • Create and structure a strong argument
  • List the parts of an argument
  • Anticipate and refute opposing views in your essay
  • Support your claims in writing with reasoning and evidence
  • Use concluding statements to support your argument

Each lesson is designed to teach you the process of writing an essay in both content and form. You'll explore the art of crafting an argument through short, engaging video lessons, and you'll also have the opportunity to test what you've learned with brief quizzes.

7 Lessons in Chapter 4: Praxis I Writing: Writing Arguments
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

1. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

There are three types of appeals that you can use in your persuasive writing to make your arguments more effective. In this video, you'll learn about logical, ethical, and emotional appeals as well as how to use them.

How to Write a Great Argument

2. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

3. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

4. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

5. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

6. How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

What makes an essay persuasive? How can you convince people that your position is the stronger side? In this lesson, we'll explore reasons and evidence and how to use them in a persuasive essay to convince others to support your side.

Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

7. Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

Many writers spend so much time on the body of their essay that the conclusion seems overwhelming. In this lesson, we'll break down the last paragraph of a persuasive essay and look at what needs to be included.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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