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Ch 13: Praxis Chemistry: Chemical Reaction Equilibrium

About This Chapter

Let us help you learn about chemical reaction equilibrium. Find the tools to get your best score on the Praxis Chemistry exam with the video lessons and self-assessment quizzes in this chapter.

Praxis Chemistry: Chemical Reaction Equilibrium - Chapter Summary

In eleven lessons designed to keep you entertained while you learn, you can study theories and practices related to chemical reaction equilibrium. The following subjects are detailed in this chapter:

  • Chemical and dynamic equilibrium
  • Le Chatelier's principle
  • Equilibrium constant and quotient
  • RICE tables and equilibrium calculations
  • Solubility equilibrium
  • The common ion effect and selective precipitation
  • Acid-base equilibrium and buffers
  • Titration of a strong acid or base
  • Titration and calculating pH

Instructors break down concepts to make understanding and retention easier. You can combine your chemistry know-how with testing-strategies you'll learn in this chapter to approach the exam with increased confidence.

Praxis Chemistry: Chemical Reaction Equilibrium Objectives

Your proficiency with secondary school chemistry content that an in-coming teacher would know will be tested on the Praxis Chemistry: Content Knowledge exam. The exam, which includes 100 multiple-choice questions, is a part of the Praxis series of exams that are mostly used in several states' teacher licensure process. The run time for the exam is two hours.

Chemical reaction equilibrium is a part of the 23-question category of Periodicity and Reactivity; Chemical Reactions, Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry. Study each video lesson, and try your hand at the self-assessment quizzes to see if you're ready to take the Praxis Chemistry: Content Knowledge exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 13: Praxis Chemistry: Chemical Reaction Equilibrium
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Equilibrium: Chemical and Dynamic

1. Equilibrium: Chemical and Dynamic

Chemical equilibrium occurs when the rate of a forward chemical reaction is equal to the rate of reverse reaction while the concentrations of products and reactants remain unchanged. Learn about equilibrium constant, dynamic state, chemical equilibrium, and how chemists use equilibrium constant equations.

LeChatelier's Principle: Disruption and Re-Establishment of Equilibrium

2. LeChatelier's Principle: Disruption and Re-Establishment of Equilibrium

Le Chatelier's Principle refers to the process of disruption and the re-establishment of equilibrium. Learn about this principle, and understand how changes in concentration, temperature, and pressure affect equilibrium.

Equilibrium Constant (K) and Reaction Quotient (Q)

3. Equilibrium Constant (K) and Reaction Quotient (Q)

The equilibrium constant, K, is a number that expresses the ratio of products and reactants in a reaction once it reaches chemical equilibrium. Explore the state of equilibrium and the significance of chemical equilibrium and the reaction quotient (Q).

Using a RICE Table in Equilibrium Calculations

4. Using a RICE Table in Equilibrium Calculations

A RICE table is used to solve equilibrium calculations. Discover what a RICE table looks like, how it is used to solve for amounts of reactants, and how to use the RICE table to solve for Keq.

Solubility Equilibrium: Using a Solubility Constant (Ksp) in Calculations

5. Solubility Equilibrium: Using a Solubility Constant (Ksp) in Calculations

Every solution has a solubility product constant (Ksp) to represent its state in dynamic equilibrium. Learn about the solubility equilibrium and how to use a Ksp in calculations, determining Ksp from ion concentration and vice-versa.

The Common Ion Effect and Selective Precipitation

6. The Common Ion Effect and Selective Precipitation

Sometimes, the addition of an ion common to two solutes in a solution reduces solubility and forms a precipitate. Explore the common ion effect and selective precipitation and learn how to predict precipitates and calculate equilibrium.

Acid-Base Equilibrium: Calculating the Ka or Kb of a Solution

7. Acid-Base Equilibrium: Calculating the Ka or Kb of a Solution

Acids and bases dissociate differently depending on strength, and dissociation constants, Ka for acids and Kb for bases, measure how well they dissociate. Learn about acid-base equilibrium and how to calculate the Ka or Kb of a solution.

Acid-Base Buffers: Calculating the pH of a Buffered Solution

8. Acid-Base Buffers: Calculating the pH of a Buffered Solution

A buffer is a solution that helps to keep the pH of a solution balanced. Learn all about buffers, the pH of a buffer solution, and the pH of a buffer solution when base or acid is added, along with examples.

Titration of a Strong Acid or a Strong Base

9. Titration of a Strong Acid or a Strong Base

In acid-base chemistry, titrations can be used to determine the concentration of an unknown solution. Explore titration, titrant, neutralization reaction and equivalence point, and how to perform a titration and interpret a titration curve.

Titrations with Weak Acids or Weak Bases

10. Titrations with Weak Acids or Weak Bases

In chemistry, titration uses known solutions (titrants) to analyze unknown solutions and their properties. Learn about titration curves and how they differ based on titrations between weak acids and strong bases or between strong acids and weak bases.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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