Ch 7: Praxis Middle School ELA: Literary Elements

About This Chapter

Refresh your understanding of literary elements in this chapter of this study guide. These lessons and self-assessment quizzes will help you review what you may need to know about the elements of literature in preparation for the Praxis English Language Arts exam.

Praxis Middle School ELA: Literary Elements - Chapter Summary

To help you prepare for the Praxis Middle School ELA exam, the lessons in this chapter examine elements of literature, including point of view, narrators, and plot. You should be familiar with the following by the end of the chapter:

  • Setting, conflict, and dialogue
  • First, second, and third point of view
  • Narrators in literature
  • How to analyze plot
  • External conflict
  • Analyzing dialogue
  • Direct and Indirect characterization

Our instructors will address each subject using engaging video lessons, and can answer any questions you may have. You can utilize the feature under the Timeline tab to jump to main subjects within the video lessons.

9 Lessons in Chapter 7: Praxis Middle School ELA: Literary Elements
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

1. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Point of View of Characters vs. the Reader

2. Point of View of Characters vs. the Reader

Point of view is a key idea in literature. In this lesson, you'll learn several points of view that writers use and how those affect the reader. When you're finished, you can test your knowledge with a short quiz.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

3. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient.

How to Analyze Plot: Steps and Examples

4. How to Analyze Plot: Steps and Examples

In this lesson, we will discuss how to analyze a plot in three basic steps. We will take these three steps and break them down to understand how to analyze a plot by analyzing a fable.

What is the Setting of a Story?

5. What is the Setting of a Story?

You may have learned about setting in elementary school, but the definition is actually a little more nuanced than just where a story takes place. This lesson explores differing aspects of setting and why it matters.

What is External Conflict in Literature? - Definition, Types & Examples

6. What is External Conflict in Literature? - Definition, Types & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn how a conflict drives a story. External conflicts are examined with examples from classic and modern literature to demonstrate the concepts.

Practice Analyzing Dialogue

7. Practice Analyzing Dialogue

Secrets, revelations, and dramatic moments often unfold through important conversations. So when we are reading a novel, short story, or play, we need to be able to analyze dialogue to understand its purpose and importance.

Direct Characterization: Definition & Examples

8. Direct Characterization: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn how an author directly establishes characterization. Unlike a lot of other literary devices, direct characterization is fairly easy to spot. Check your understanding of the lesson with a short quiz at the end.

Indirect Characterization: Definition & Examples

9. Indirect Characterization: Definition & Examples

In children's stories, the author might directly describe a character as either 'evil' or 'kind-hearted.' But in more advanced works, the author usually describes how characters behave to show their personality. This is an example of indirect characterization, which is the focus of this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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