Ch 19: Praxis Middle School Social Studies: America in World War II

About This Chapter

Use these lessons to prepare for the Praxis Middle School Social Studies exam and refresh your knowledge of the events of World War II the role Americans had in the war.

Praxis Middle School Social Studies: America in World War II - Chapter Summary

In this series of short lesson videos, our expert instructors will help you prepare for exam questions on the Praxis Middle School Social Studies exam about the events of World War II and the actions and policies of the United States during the war. These lessons are mobile device compatible, so that if you have access to an internet ready mobile device you will have a portable way to review:

  • The aggression of Germany, Italy and Japan during the 1930s and the causes of WWII
  • The attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S. declaration of war
  • Battles of the European theater of the war
  • Battles of the Pacific theater of the war
  • Life in the U.S. and domestic politics during the war
  • Anti-semitism and genocide in Nazi Germany
  • Japanese internment in the U.S.
  • Events that ended WWII
  • Post-war American life and the counter-culture of post-war America

For an additional review of the material presented in these lessons, read the lesson transcripts after you watch the lesson videos. Then test your knowledge of the information presented in these lessons by completing the lesson quizzes. Whenever you discover a topic that you don't understand, use the video tags review the parts of the lessons that explained it. If this doesn't help, ask our instructors for assistance with the teach tabs of the lessons.

14 Lessons in Chapter 19: Praxis Middle School Social Studies: America in World War II
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
World War II: The Start of the Second World War

1. World War II: The Start of the Second World War

Learn all about the start of World War II and why the League of Nations could not stop aggression by Italy, Germany and Japan in the 1930s, which led to the outbreak of this second global conflict.

The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

2. The Attack on Pearl Harbor: The Beginning of American Involvement in World War II

On December 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan launched a surprise attack against Allied possessions in the Pacific, including the American military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. After decades of conflict between the two nations, the U.S. declared war.

The European Theater in WWII: The Eastern Front, Western Front & Fight for North Africa

3. The European Theater in WWII: The Eastern Front, Western Front & Fight for North Africa

Hitler and Nazi Germany dominated the European fields of battle early in WWII. This lesson is an overview of key military operations between 1939 and 1943 in Europe on both the Eastern and Western fronts.

The Holocaust: Anti-Semitism and Genocide in Nazi Germany

4. The Holocaust: Anti-Semitism and Genocide in Nazi Germany

The Holocaust was the persecution and mass murder of as many as 11 million people by Adolf Hitler and the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. Learn about the people they targeted, the progression of events leading up to the Final Solution and the end of the genocide in this lesson.

The Pacific Ocean Theater of WWII: Japan vs. The Allies

5. The Pacific Ocean Theater of WWII: Japan vs. The Allies

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States entered WWII. Watch this video to learn about some of the key battles, as well as the general nature, of the Pacific theater of the war.

The United States During WWII: The Home Front

6. The United States During WWII: The Home Front

When the United States entered World War II in December 1941, life changed almost overnight for those on the battle front and on the home front. Learn about the war's dramatic and lasting effects on American government, economy and society.

Domestic Politics During World War II: The Election of 1940

7. Domestic Politics During World War II: The Election of 1940

The rest of the world was already fighting World War II, but the United States had a decision to make: should the nation stay out of it or try to save the day? Learn about this decision and more in this lesson.

Domestic Politics During World War II: The War Years (1941-1945)

8. Domestic Politics During World War II: The War Years (1941-1945)

Even during wartime, democracy continues. In this lesson, we'll learn how politics affected President Roosevelt's war policies and about the 1944 election and its implications for the post-war world.

Japanese-American Internment: Facts and History

9. Japanese-American Internment: Facts and History

The attack on Pearl Harbor unleashed a wave of fear and prejudice toward Japanese Americans. In this lesson, we'll learn how the government forced them into internment camps, what life in the camps was like, and how the internment affected the nation.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: How the Atomic Bomb Changed Warfare During WWII

10. Hiroshima and Nagasaki: How the Atomic Bomb Changed Warfare During WWII

As America and its WWII allies considered invading Japan, the Manhattan Project successfully developed an atomic weapon. Its use on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, precipitated VJ Day, the end of the Pacific war, on August 14, 1945.

The Yalta Conference and The Potsdam Conference: US Diplomacy & International Politics During World War II

11. The Yalta Conference and The Potsdam Conference: US Diplomacy & International Politics During World War II

Throughout the course of WWII, leaders of many Allied nations met many times to discuss strategy. Then, near the end of the war, two historic conferences shaped the post-war world.

Post-War American Politics: Foreign & Domestic Policy

12. Post-War American Politics: Foreign & Domestic Policy

In this lesson, we will learn about American politics in the post-war era. We will highlight the broad contours of foreign and domestic policies, and learn how Americans planned to deal with the challenges of an increasingly complex world.

Post-War American Life: Culture of the late 1940s & 1950s

13. Post-War American Life: Culture of the late 1940s & 1950s

In this lesson, we will explore American postwar culture. We will learn what life was like throughout the late 1940s and the 1950s by highlighting important cultural trends.

The Counter-Culture of Post-War America

14. The Counter-Culture of Post-War America

In this lesson we will explore the counter-culture of the postwar era. We will examine the groups and individuals who defied the conventions of mainstream society.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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