Ch 12: Praxis Middle School Social Studies: American Civil War

About This Chapter

Look over this chapter to refresh your knowledge of important aspects of the American Civil War, from southern secession to Lincoln's assassination. Studying these lessons should help you prepare for the American history questions on the Praxis Middle School Social Studies exam.

Praxis Middle School Social Studies: American Civil War - Chapter Summary

You may use this chapter to review key events of the American Civil War as part of your studies for the Praxis Middle School Social Studies exam. Topics that will be detailed and explained in these lessons include:

  • Election of Abraham Lincoln and the foundation of the Confederate States of America
  • Battle of Fort Sumter, beginning of the Civil War and advantages of the North and South
  • Significant battles, including the First Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Antietam
  • Context and impact of the Emancipation Proclamation
  • Impact of the war on life in the North and the South
  • Pivotal battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg
  • Grant's march to Richmond, Sherman's March to the Sea, and the end of the war
  • General Lee's surrender and Lincoln's assassination

You will be led through these lessons by an expert instructor whose aim is to explain the history of the American Civil War in a clear and concise manner. After you study each lesson, you may test how well you understand and remember what you've reviewed by taking the accompanying practice quiz. There is also a cumulative exam you may take after studying the whole chapter to get a better feel for how well you understand the entirety of the chapter's content.

Praxis Middle School Social Studies: American Civil War - Chapter Objectives

As a part of attaining certification to teach middle school social studies courses, you must pass the Praxis Middle School Social Studies exam. The selected-response and open-response questions on this exam are meant to gauge your knowledge of basic content typically covered in social studies courses on the middle school level. Nineteen percent of the exam focuses on your knowledge of U.S. history, potentially including questions on the Civil War. Through a careful review of this chapter's content, you should become familiar with the basic key events and aspects of the Civil War and, therefore, be capable of answering any pertinent questions on the exam.

11 Lessons in Chapter 12: Praxis Middle School Social Studies: American Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

1. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

2. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

South Carolina's attack on a U.S. military outpost triggered the American Civil War. Learn more about the Battle of Fort Sumter and the consequences of the fort's surrender to the Confederacy.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

3. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

4. The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

Three months after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Northern troops attacked Southern forces near the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. The first Battle of Bull Run (or Manassas) was the first major engagement of the Civil War and a terrifying defeat for the Union spectators who came to watch.

Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

5. Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

In 1862, the Union put its Anaconda Plan into action, resulting in several critical events: the Peninsular Campaign, the Battle of Hampton Roads between the ironclads Monitor and Virginia (Merrimack), the Battle of Shiloh, the capture of New Orleans, and the Battle of Antietam.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

6. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

7. How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

With the strongest and most productive demographic of society away fighting in the Civil War, the task of running homes, communities, and the nation fell to those who stayed behind. The war on the home front changed their lives forever.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

8. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

9. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Sherman's March to the Sea

10. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General William T. Sherman began his Atlanta campaign. His success assured Lincoln's re-election in 1864. Sherman then began his destructive March to the Sea in order to capture Savannah.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

11. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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