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Ch 11: Prentice Hall US History Chapter 11: The Civil War (1861-1865)

About This Chapter

The Civil War (1861-1865) chapter of this Prentice Hall US History Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with the Civil War. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Civil War textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in Prentice Hall's The Civil War (1861-1865) chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the Civil War topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • The Civil War's beginning
  • Analysis of the armies of the Union and Confederacy
  • The Battle of Bull Run
  • Main battles in 1862
  • The Emancipation Proclamation
  • African American involvement
  • The effects of the Civil War on life and the economy
  • The Civil War's turning points
  • Gettysburg Address
  • The March to the Sea
  • Lincoln's reelection and assassination
  • Casualties and the South following the war's end

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14 Lessons in Chapter 11: Prentice Hall US History Chapter 11: The Civil War (1861-1865)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

1. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

2. The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

Three months after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Northern troops attacked Southern forces near the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. The first Battle of Bull Run (or Manassas) was the first major engagement of the Civil War and a terrifying defeat for the Union spectators who came to watch.

Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

3. Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

In 1862, the Union put its Anaconda Plan into action, resulting in several critical events: the Peninsular Campaign, the Battle of Hampton Roads between the ironclads Monitor and Virginia (Merrimack), the Battle of Shiloh, the capture of New Orleans, and the Battle of Antietam.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

4. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

African Americans in the Civil War: History & Facts

5. African Americans in the Civil War: History & Facts

In this lesson, we will explore the experiences of African Americans during the Civil War. Some of them were slaves; others were free. Some were 'contraband' runaways; others were soldiers. Together, they contributed greatly to Civil War history.

Civilian Reaction in the Confederacy to the War: The Impact on Daily Life & the Economy

6. Civilian Reaction in the Confederacy to the War: The Impact on Daily Life & the Economy

In this lesson, we will study the Confederate home front. We will examine how the Civil War affected the South's government, economy, and social fabric, and we will see how the Southerners faced destruction and displacement throughout the war.

How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

7. How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

With the strongest and most productive demographic of society away fighting in the Civil War, the task of running homes, communities, and the nation fell to those who stayed behind. The war on the home front changed their lives forever.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

8. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

9. Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

This lesson discusses the Gettysburg Address, one of the most famous speeches in American history. Learn more about what Abraham Lincoln's speech means and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Sherman's March to the Sea

10. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General William T. Sherman began his Atlanta campaign. His success assured Lincoln's re-election in 1864. Sherman then began his destructive March to the Sea in order to capture Savannah.

The Politics of 1864: President Abraham Lincoln is Re-Elected

11. The Politics of 1864: President Abraham Lincoln is Re-Elected

In this lesson, we will explore the turbulent political landscape of 1864, focusing especially on that year's presidential campaign that pitted incumbent Abraham Lincoln against General George McClellan.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

12. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Casualties of the Civil War: Statistics & Causes

13. Casualties of the Civil War: Statistics & Causes

In this lesson, we will discuss the casualties of the Civil War. We will begin by taking a look at a few statistics before examining common causes of death and wounds, and learning about battlefield medicine and treatment of prisoners of war.

The American Civil War's Impact on the Economy, Society, Politics & Government

14. The American Civil War's Impact on the Economy, Society, Politics & Government

By studying this lesson on the Civil War era, you'll learn about the economic, political, and social changes that took place during this impactful period in American history.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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