Ch 7: Prentice Hall US History Chapter 7: Nationalism and Sectionalism (1812-1855)

About This Chapter

The Nationalism and Sectionalism (1812-1855) chapter of this Prentice Hall US History Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with sectional tensions and their causes. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Nationalism and Sectionalism textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in Prentice Hall's Nationalism and Sectionalism (1812-1855) chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the nationalism and sectionalism topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Transportation Revolution and industrialization
  • Northern development
  • National Trades Union & Worker's Strike of 1834
  • Southern life and the cotton gin
  • Missouri Compromise
  • 1824 presidential election
  • The Romantic Period
  • Gibbons v. Ogden
  • Jackson versus the Whig Party
  • Trail of Tears
  • Conflict over states' rights
  • Bank of the United States

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12 Lessons in Chapter 7: Prentice Hall US History Chapter 7: Nationalism and Sectionalism (1812-1855)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

1. The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

In the half-century before the Civil War, America experienced a transportation revolution that improved the way people and goods crossed the nation, opened up new areas for settlement and altered the centers of economic power.

American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

2. American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

New agricultural technology revolutionized the North, South and West. In this lesson, learn how that technology ushered in the Market Revolution in America.

Economic Developments in the North: A Commercial Revolution

3. Economic Developments in the North: A Commercial Revolution

In the Antebellum Era, the Northern part of the United States was revolutionized by a series of innovations, triggering a shift from an agricultural to a commercial economy. These economic changes sharpened the differences between North and South.

The National Trades' Union & Worker's Strike of 1834

4. The National Trades' Union & Worker's Strike of 1834

This lesson discusses the formation of the first National Trades Union and the Lowell workers' strike of 1834. It defines mill girls and journeyman, while also discussing the working conditions of early 19th-century America.

Life in the South: Ordered Society and Economy of the Southern States

5. Life in the South: Ordered Society and Economy of the Southern States

While the North was urbanizing and industrializing, the South became more committed to its rural, leisurely lifestyle and its agricultural economy built on slave labor. Limited industry did exist, but cotton was king!

Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

6. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

7. President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

The election of 1824 and its candidates played a huge role in the election of John Quincy Adams as president. In this lesson, look at the dramatic turn in presidential politics and the not-so-remarkable presidency of this public servant.

The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

8. The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

This video introduces American Romanticism, a movement where literature focused on intuition, imagination and individualism. Authors such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow contributed to what became known as the American identity, as the new country did its best to distance itself from European tradition.

Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

9. Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

In this lesson, we will discuss how Andrew Jackson's administration strengthened executive power as well as the rise of the Whig Party in opposition to Jackson and his policies.

The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

10. The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

In this lesson, we'll discuss Jackson's forced removal of Native Americans from their land in the east to new territory west of the Mississippi River.

Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

11. Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

In this lesson, we will explore sectional tensions that emerged between the West, North, and South over land and tariffs, leading to confrontations in the Senate and a second nullification crisis.

Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

12. Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

In this lesson, we will discuss President Andrew Jackson's economic policies, including his determination to close the Bank of the United States and the financial panic of 1837.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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