Ch 6: Presenting to an Audience: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4

About This Chapter

Find lessons for eleventh and twelfth grade English. The following lessons meet the Common Core Speaking and Listening standard for presenting to an audience (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4).

Standard: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks. (CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.SL.11-12.4).

About This Chapter

Students who have mastered the concepts addressed in this standard can effectively and persuasively present a speech to an audience. They can clearly present their ideas that are supported by research and evidence. Students have knowledge of the audience they're speaking to and are able to adapt their presentation to a specific audience.

Concepts on presenting to an audience covered in these lessons include:

  • Types of speeches
  • Audience-centered speakers
  • Audience analysis using informal and formal methods
  • Information gathering for audience analysis
  • Steps for choosing an appropriate speech topic
  • General and specific purposes for a speech
  • Thesis statement development

Students have mastery of this standard when they can understand the needs of the audience and the purpose for a speech and create a presentation that works for both. They know how to identify an appropriate topic for their speech and can recognize and address opposing viewpoints. Students who have mastered this standard are aware of time restrictions and know the importance of narrowing their topic so that the key points are addressed within the time constraints.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Here are some tips for how to use these lessons to support instruction in the standard:

Lessons on Adapting to an Audience

Watch lessons on audience analysis and adapting to an audience during class. Divide the class into small groups of no more than 4 students. Have each student prepare a speech that is adapted to the interests and needs of their small group. At the same time, each student should come up with criteria for determining if a speech works for the selected audience. Students within each group can take turns presenting their speeches and receiving feedback from the audience.

Lessons on Analyzing an Audience

Have students brainstorm formal and informal methods for analyzing an audience before, during and after a speech. Discuss the ways that this information can help improve a speech or prepare speakers for future presentations.

Lessons on Determining a Speaker's Perspective

Provide students with a speech made by a historical figure. Have them read through the speech on their own time. In class, ask students to identify the perspective of the speaker and how he or she supported that perspective. Discuss how the speaker might have analyzed his audience and streamlined his topic to meet the interests of the audience.

11 Lessons in Chapter 6: Presenting to an Audience: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Types of Speeches: Informative, Persuasive, and Special Occasion

1. Types of Speeches: Informative, Persuasive, and Special Occasion

There are essentially three types of speeches public speakers use to influence their audience. In this lesson, we'll look at those three types of speeches and how each serves a different purpose.

Be an Audience-Centered Speaker: Focusing on Listeners' Needs

2. Be an Audience-Centered Speaker: Focusing on Listeners' Needs

The best way a speaker can ensure that his message is communicated effectively is to consider his audience and their biases and beliefs. Getting to know and understand the audience will help to create a speech that carries meaning.

Informal and Formal Methods of Audience Analysis

3. Informal and Formal Methods of Audience Analysis

There are three formal concentrations a good public speaker needs to focus on when conducting a formal audience analysis. There are also times when an informal analysis will do. Learn more about both types in this lesson.

Gathering Information for Audience Analysis: Research & Observation

4. Gathering Information for Audience Analysis: Research & Observation

An audience analysis is an essential step in writing and presenting a speech that is meaningful to an audience. The speaker will look at several traits, characteristics and conditions of his audience to best suit the speech to their needs.

Adapting to Your Audience During and After Your Speech

5. Adapting to Your Audience During and After Your Speech

Preparing for your speech is only one way in which a speaker can ensure audience adaptation. You need a keen eye for non-verbal cues during and after the speech to determine whether your audience is paying attention.

Understanding Reasons for a Public Speaking Event

6. Understanding Reasons for a Public Speaking Event

In this lesson, you'll learn how to prepare for a speaking event. Learn how to tailor your speech to be appropriate for the event based on your background, the occasion and the audience.

General Purpose vs. Specific Purpose of a Speech

7. General Purpose vs. Specific Purpose of a Speech

Understanding the general and specific purpose of your speech will help you develop and focus your speech to meet the needs of your delivery and of your audience. This lesson will help you understand the differences and how to create a specific purpose statement.

Choosing an Appropriate Speech Topic: Steps & Characteristics

8. Choosing an Appropriate Speech Topic: Steps & Characteristics

In this lesson, learn tips and tricks for generating ideas for a speech. We'll explore how to select an appropriate topic and the methods of finding a good topic for your speech.

Public Speaking with Time Limits: How to Prepare

9. Public Speaking with Time Limits: How to Prepare

It can be overwhelming at times to find a topic that is just right for the speech you are giving. A great way to decide upon the best topic for time limits is to determine if your topic is too broad, too narrow, or if it is a focused topic.

Turning Your Topic into Main Points for Your Speech: Tips & Ideas

10. Turning Your Topic into Main Points for Your Speech: Tips & Ideas

Once you have a topic in mind, it can sometimes be difficult to decide on main ideas. This lesson will show you brainstorming techniques to help when you get stuck in the speech writing process.

Developing a Thesis Statement from Your Speech Topic

11. Developing a Thesis Statement from Your Speech Topic

The thesis statement is a vital part of your speech. In this lesson, learn how to create a thesis statement and identify problems in existing thesis statements.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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