Copyright

Ch 53: Principles of Mechanics

About This Chapter

This overview of the principles of mechanics will boost your understanding of uniform circular motion, Newton's laws, friction, and more. These lessons will assist you with getting prepared to take an exam or engage in a class discussion.

Principles of Mechanics - Chapter Summary

In this chapter on the principles of mechanics, engaging lessons help you get a clear understanding of friction, motion, power, work, and momentum. You will also review energy equations used to solve simple harmonic motion problems. After going through the lessons, you should be able to do the following:

  • Explain kinematics
  • Use equations for centripetal force and acceleration to solve problems
  • Calculate relative velocity
  • Discuss Newton's laws and Hooke's law
  • Explain how a change in momentum affects an object
  • Provide examples of conservation of linear momentum
  • Distinguish the difference between center of mass and center of gravity
  • Recall the principles of elastic and inelastic collisions.

A short quiz is available to test your knowledge of each lesson, and the quizzes can be printed. The quizzes link back to specific topics in the video, so if you get a question wrong you can quickly go back and review that particular topic. You can also submit questions to our instructors if there are any areas you don't understand.

14 Lessons in Chapter 53: Principles of Mechanics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Kinematics? - Studying the Motion of Objects

1. What is Kinematics? - Studying the Motion of Objects

Kinematics is a branch of classical mechanics that is concerned with the study of the motion of objects or systems, without considering the forces involved or the causes of the motion. Explore the languages of science, learn about the definition of kinematics, and be able to tell what factors are considered under kinematics.

Uniform Circular Motion: Definition & Mathematics

2. Uniform Circular Motion: Definition & Mathematics

Uniform circular motion is a state of motion in a circle occurring at a consistent speed. Explore acceleration, centripetal force, and centrifugal force, and practice calculating the mathematical equations that express this physics concept.

Understanding Relative Velocity in Kinematics

3. Understanding Relative Velocity in Kinematics

After completing this lesson, you will be able to explain what relative velocity is in kinematics and calculate relative velocities in basic situations. A short quiz will follow the lesson summary.

Newton's Laws of Force & Motion

4. Newton's Laws of Force & Motion

Newton's laws of motion explain why we observe the motion we do in the world around us - they explain how forces work. In this lesson, we take a look at each of Newton's laws one by one.

Friction: Definition and Types

5. Friction: Definition and Types

Friction is the force that resists motion between two objects or surfaces that are in contact with each other. Learn about the definition of friction, discover the two types of friction -- static friction and sliding friction, and explore their differences.

Motion: Linear, Simple Harmonic, Circular & Projectile

6. Motion: Linear, Simple Harmonic, Circular & Projectile

In physics, motion occurs when an object changes position over time. Explore the types of motion called linear, projectile, circular, and simple harmonic motion, and learn about velocity.

Simple Harmonic Motion: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy

7. Simple Harmonic Motion: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy

Simple harmonic motion is a periodic, repetitive motion where force is equal to displacement. Explore how kinetic and potential energy go hand in hand with simple harmonic motion and how to calculate this motion with an example.

Work: Definition, Characteristics, and Examples

8. Work: Definition, Characteristics, and Examples

In physics, work refers to the distance an object moves due to the force applied to it. Learn about the definition, components, and characteristics of work, and discover how to calculate the amount of work done on an object through some examples.

Power: Definition and Mathematics

9. Power: Definition and Mathematics

Power in mathematics refers to how much work can be done in a certain amount of time, meaning the more work that can be done in the same amount of time means more power. Study the definition of power in mathematics and how it is calculated.

Momentum and Impulse: Definition, Theorem and Examples

10. Momentum and Impulse: Definition, Theorem and Examples

Impulse is directly related to the change in momentum of an object. Learn more about the definition and examples of momentum and impulse, as well as how impulse affects momentum, explore the impulse-momentum theorem, and understand how changing time and force affects the relation.

Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

11. Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

Conservation of linear momentum explains that the momentum of a system will remain the same unless an outside force is applied. Using examples, learn the formula comprising Newton's third law of motion, the relationship between momentum and external forces, and how momentum is conserved in a system.

Understanding the Center of Mass & Center of Gravity

12. Understanding the Center of Mass & Center of Gravity

The center of mass and the center of gravity may not always be equal, and this can have important implications. Learn how to determine the center of mass vs. the center of gravity, and review examples demonstrating that an object's center of mass and its center of gravity are not the same.

Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

13. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

Elastic and inelastic are the two types of collisions that follow the law of conservation of momentum. Learn about the principles of collisions/momentum and the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions.

Hooke's Law & the Spring Constant: Definition & Equation

14. Hooke's Law & the Spring Constant: Definition & Equation

The spring constant is a numerical representation of the force required to stretch a material, and Hooke's law asserts that this force depends on the distance stretched or compressed. Explore equations and calculations utilizing these two concepts in explaining elasticity.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 220 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the National Entrance Screening Test (NEST): Exam Prep course

Support