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Ch 22: Properties of Gases and Liquids

About This Chapter

Study for your next test or better understand an assignment that covers the properties of gases and liquids with help from this chapter. Fun lessons, short quizzes, a practice exam and other resources can increase and reinforce your comprehension of this subject.

Properties of Gases and Liquids - Chapter Summary

This self-paced chapter makes it easy to learn about or refresh your existing knowledge of the properties of gases and liquids. Fit your review of the states of matter, Gay-Lussac's Law, real gases and more into your busy schedule by accessing lessons anywhere with an Internet connection. When finished, you will be ready to:

  • Define and describe the four states of matter
  • List types of intermolecular forces in chemistry
  • Discuss Gay-Lussac's Law and the relationship between the temperature and pressure of a gas
  • Describe real gases and how they sometimes deviate from ideal gas laws
  • Share details about Avogadro's number and the use of mole to count atoms
  • Explain the basics of viscosity, surface tension, capillary action and physical changes

Lessons in this chapter are accessible 24/7 from any tablet, smartphone or computer. Review them at your leisure to absorb the information they cover at a comfortable pace. Before, during or after examining the lessons, take multiple-choice quizzes to assess your comprehension of the topic they cover. Get a complete review of the properties of gases and liquids by taking the practice exam.

6 Lessons in Chapter 22: Properties of Gases and Liquids
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

1. States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

Learn the four states of matter in the universe: solid, liquid, gas and plasma. Learn about the differences in shape and volume among the four states, which of the states is the most common and why plasma conducts electricity.

Intermolecular Forces in Chemistry: Definition, Types & Examples

2. Intermolecular Forces in Chemistry: Definition, Types & Examples

This lesson defines the major forces that occur between molecules. Specifically, the lesson explains ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, and London (or dispersion) forces. Several examples are included to provide context.

Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

3. Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

You may know that you aren't supposed to put an aerosol can in a fire because it could explode, but do you know why? In this lesson, we will explain Gay-Lussac's law, which shows the relationship between the temperature and pressure of a gas.

Real Gases: Deviation From the Ideal Gas Laws

4. Real Gases: Deviation From the Ideal Gas Laws

The ideal gas law is used to describe the behavior of ideal gases, but sometimes the conditions are such that gases behave differently. When this is the case we can use the van der Waals equation to describe the behavior of real gases under these non-ideal conditions.

Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

5. Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

How do we move from the atomic world to the regular world? Because atoms are so tiny, how can we count and measure them? And what do chemists celebrate at 6:02 AM on October 23rd each year? In this lesson, you will be learning how Avogadro's number and the mole can answer these questions.

Surface Tension, Capillary Action, Viscosity & Physical Changes

6. Surface Tension, Capillary Action, Viscosity & Physical Changes

There are many mysteries in the universe. This lesson will focus on a few that can be easily explained due to intermolecular forces, mainly surface tension, capillary action, viscosity, and physical changes.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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