Copyright

Ch 6: Argument & Evidence Analysis in Writing

About This Chapter

Work through the lessons to learn more about argument and evidence analysis as they relate to writing. The self-assessment quizzes that are partnered with the lessons will test your knowledge of this chapter's information.

Argument & Evidence Analysis in Writing - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you will get a firsthand look at how to analyze arguments and evidence in writing. This is a useful skill to have in order to become an accomplished writer. After going through all the lessons in this chapter, you'll know about the following:

  • Examples of how arguments are constructed and the pieces of an argument
  • Ways to persuade readers through writing
  • Three ways to assess evidence
  • Strategies for improving supporting information
  • Difference between effectiveness and validity
  • How to analyze writing
  • Speech and letter analysis

The lessons in this chapter are mobile friendly for your convenience. You can study in the comfort of your home on your computer, or you can study on the go on your smartphone or tablet. Having this flexibility allows you to study when it is convenient for you. You can also keep track of your progress through the chapter by completing the lesson quizzes.

10 Lessons in Chapter 6: Argument & Evidence Analysis in Writing
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

1. Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

Argument structures are fundamental in structuring an explanation or reasoning for something that you need someone else to understand. Learn more about the definition and relation to philosophy, it's use of premise, and conclusion.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

2. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

An effective argument is meant to persuade others of the speakers claim. Discover more about the four parts of an argument--the claim, counterclaim, reason, and evidence--how each part functions and how they come together to build a strong argument.

How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

3. How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

When writing a persuasive essay, it's important to support claims so readers can understand and see the justifications for the position taken. Learn more about supporting claims in writing using argument, persuasion, reasoning, and evidence.

Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

4. Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

It's important to know what you're reading. In this lesson, we're going to examine the evidence in informational texts to learn whether it's valid or not.

Using Details to Support an Argument

5. Using Details to Support an Argument

An argument will have adequate attention to detail in order to support its critical claims and communicate a point better. Learn more about how to use details properly and which strategies you can employ to make your arguments better and more factual.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

6. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In order to determine the effectiveness and validity of an argument, one must pay close attention to its elements. Learn how to analyze whether or not an argument works by examining its parts, including its claim, reasons, evidence, and assumptions.

Writing an Analysis of an Author's Argument

7. Writing an Analysis of an Author's Argument

The SAT includes an essay portion where an author's argument must be analyzed and expressed in writing. Learn strategies to analyze and decipher an argument based on its rhetoric and how this can be applied to the SAT.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

8. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

Learning how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic can help broaden a reader's understanding of a topic. Discover the benefits of synthesizing related texts, learn how to analyze texts and synthesize information, and practice these two skills with the help of examples.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Speech

9. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Speech

Though some speeches can inspire emotion, the proper analysis of a speech requires considering more formal criteria. Learn how to analyze and interpret a speech, explore its common elements, and practice how to analyze a speech by examining John F. Kennedy's civil rights speech.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Letter

10. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Letter

Letters are one of many primary source documents that historians analyze to recollect information about past times. Learn how to analyze and interpret a letter, and practice how to do it by examining a letter from Christopher Columbus.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken
More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Argument & Evidence Analysis in Writing.
Support