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Ch 7: Reading Assessment Strategies

About This Chapter

There are many different factors to consider when conducting reading assessments. This chapter provides you with teacher resources that elaborate on how to incorporate the different reading assessment styles in your classroom.

Reading Assessment Strategies - Chapter Summary

Our instructors have designed these lessons to show you the different strategies you can use with your students to conduct more effective reading assessments. Some of the topics addressed in this chapter include the following:

  • Designing fair and standardized assessments
  • Using activities in the school setting as part of the assessment process
  • Assessing student's ability to establish connections in texts

Each lesson will go into detail about all the major reading assessment strategies that you want to know about. The video lessons show you key concepts, and you can watch these videos at any time to review the information. The text lessons read like a well-organized set of notes that include headers and bold keywords for easier scanning. You will know if you have really learned this material by taking each of the lesson quizzes as well as the chapter exam. If you don't like your scores, review the information you missed and retake the quizzes or exam as needed.

How It Helps

  • Provides detailed examples: As you learn about reading assessment strategies, our instructors use practical examples that you could apply directly to your classroom.
  • Enhances assessment skills: By going through the lessons, you'll deepen your knowledge about the assessment process and discover new strategies to try out with students.
  • Improves student learning: If these lessons teach you to assess students more accurately, you can routinely alter your lesson plans to meet the needs of your current students.

Skills Covered

At the close of this chapter, you will be able to:

  • Apply Bloom's Taxonomy to your assessments
  • Measure the validity, reliability, and practicality of assessments
  • Compare formative and standardized assessments against summative evaluations
  • Differentiate between process and product with performance assessments
  • Choose literacy assessments that are student-appropriate
  • Pick among technique options for reading comprehension assessments
  • Apply the Cloze technique
  • Allow assessments to guide how you construct language arts lesson plans

9 Lessons in Chapter 7: Reading Assessment Strategies
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Bloom's Taxonomy and Assessments

1. Bloom's Taxonomy and Assessments

Bloom's Taxonomy is a popular and extremely helpful tool that is used by most teachers. In this lesson, we'll discuss the original and revised Bloom's Taxonomy as well as how to use it in the classroom to assess learning and cognitive ability.

Qualities of Good Assessments: Standardization, Practicality, Reliability & Validity

2. Qualities of Good Assessments: Standardization, Practicality, Reliability & Validity

Have you ever been in the middle of an assessment and thought, 'This question is unfair!' or 'This exam covers material I have never seen before!' If so, the assessment probably did not possess the qualities that make an assessment effective. This lesson will introduce you to the qualities of good assessments: reliability, standardization, validity, and practicality.

Standardized Assessments & Formative vs. Summative Evaluations

3. Standardized Assessments & Formative vs. Summative Evaluations

If you have ever attended a public school or college you have been subjected to a form of standardized assessment. These assessments serve multiple purposes and provide valuable information regarding one's abilities, understanding and potential. This lesson will introduce you to the types of standardized assessments commonly used in schools and discuss two other types of assessments: formative and summative.

Performance Assessments: Product vs. Process

4. Performance Assessments: Product vs. Process

Playing a musical instrument, creating a spreadsheet and performing in a play are all activities that many of us engage in on a regular basis. These activities are also examples of ways teachers assess a student's mastery of a subject in educational settings. This lesson will define performance-based assessments and discuss the various uses of performance assessments in the classroom.

Selecting Appropriate Literacy Assessments for Students

5. Selecting Appropriate Literacy Assessments for Students

Assessment is a crucial aspect of literacy instruction, but choosing the right assessment makes all the difference. This lesson will cover how to select appropriate assessments for students.

Assessment Techniques for Reading Comprehension

6. Assessment Techniques for Reading Comprehension

Need to assess your students' reading ability? Not quite sure where to begin? This lesson describes several techniques reading teachers can use to assess students' reading comprehension.

Using Cloze for Assessment

7. Using Cloze for Assessment

The cloze procedure is a useful tool for reading assessment. This lesson will detail several ways you can use the procedure to assess your students' reading comprehension and grammar skills.

Using Assessments to Plan Language Arts Instruction

8. Using Assessments to Plan Language Arts Instruction

Teachers make decisions about what to teach and when from many sources. One of these is using assessments. How does this work? This lesson outlines using assessments to inform instruction in language arts.

Formative Assessment Ideas for Reading

9. Formative Assessment Ideas for Reading

Casual assessment is imperative to keep track of student progress through the year. This lesson offers ideas for formative reading assessment activities.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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