Ch 7: Reading Comprehension & Response

About This Chapter

The fun lessons in this chapter can help you improve your reading comprehension and response to literature. Each one of our lessons comes with a quiz that can help you master this information to write a great essay or complete a tough reading assignment.

Reading Comprehension & Response - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you'll review the concepts and steps needed to understand what you read and provide thoughtful analysis and response. Lesson topics include how to paraphrase what you read, draw inferences from a reading passage and compare and contrast ideas between two or more texts. Our self-paced lessons allow you to review this information as many times as needed. You can study on your mobile phone, tablet or computer, 24 hours a day, in order to learn these topics easily and conveniently. If you have any questions about the lessons, our instructors are here to help. After reviewing this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Summarize and restate an idea
  • Synthesize written information
  • Use supporting details to explain the main point
  • Identify the audience, purpose and tone in an essay
  • Analyze an author's voice, language and style

8 Lessons in Chapter 7: Reading Comprehension & Response
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

1. How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

Understanding how to restate an idea and summarize the information you have read is an important reading skill. In this lesson, you'll learn how to rephrase the main points of an essay, argument, or reading passage into a clear summary.

How to Paraphrase: Definition & Examples

2. How to Paraphrase: Definition & Examples

Find out what it means to paraphrase, what the benefits are, and how paraphrasing is different from other ways to cite sources. You will also see examples of the ways paraphrasing can be used.

How to Synthesize Written Information

3. How to Synthesize Written Information

Synthesizing written information is the process of taking multiple sources and bringing them together into one cohesive idea, while bringing in a new idea or theory. This lesson explains different ways to do this effectively.

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

4. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Drawing Inferences in Fiction

5. Drawing Inferences in Fiction

In this lesson, we will discuss inferences in fiction. We will talk about what an inference is, learn how to make one and practice drawing inferences with some writing samples.

Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

6. Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

What is tone? How do you create a tone within an essay? Watch this video lesson to learn how writing with a specific audience and purpose in mind will help you to achieve an appropriate tone.

Analyzing an Author's Style, Voice & Language

7. Analyzing an Author's Style, Voice & Language

What separates one author's writing from another? The short answer is the author's voice, comprised of their style and use of language. This lesson explores the concepts in more detail.

Comparing & Contrasting Ideas Between Two or More Texts

8. Comparing & Contrasting Ideas Between Two or More Texts

The lesson explores ways to compare and contrast two works of literature. We will investigate the similarities and differences between setting, plot, point of view, and metaphor in two classic dystopian novels: George Orwell's '1984' and Ray Bradbury's 'Fahrenheit 451.'

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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