Ch 1: Reading & Research Skills

About This Chapter

Improve your reading and research skills with this chapter on subjects like how to draw conclusions when reading a text and how to write a great thesis statement. If you are preparing for an exam or class discussion, these lessons and quizzes can help boost your confidence by testing your knowledge of the topics in advance.

Reading & Research Skills - Chapter Summary

With this chapter on reading and research skills, you can gain a better understanding of how to make inferences, create a bibliography, and determine whether sources are credible. You can also improve your ability to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information. By the end of the chapter, you should feel confident and prepared to:

  • Recall the criteria for establishing a causal relationship
  • Detail what makes a great thesis statement
  • Provide an example of an implied main idea and a supporting detail
  • Differentiate between fact and opinion in a text
  • Explain how to draw conclusions
  • Define the terms bias, assumption, and stereotype
  • Write a research question
  • Recall three different ways to present information

The skillful teaching styles of our educators can help you quickly absorb relevant details as you develop reading and research skills. A brief quiz is included with each lesson. Additionally, the lessons all include full written transcripts that you can print and use to study wherever you go.

13 Lessons in Chapter 1: Reading & Research Skills
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Cause and Effect Relationship: Definition & Examples

1. Cause and Effect Relationship: Definition & Examples

This lesson explores the relationship between cause and effect and teaches you about the criteria for establishing a causal relationship, the difference between correlation and causation, and more.

What is a Thesis Statement?

2. What is a Thesis Statement?

Before we can talk about how to write a great thesis statement, you need to be able to identify a great thesis when you see one. Contrary to what you may have been taught, a thesis is so much more than just the last sentence of the opening paragraph of an essay.

Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

3. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

4. Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

Find out what supporting details are and their role in essay writing. Learn the different ways to include supporting details, then take a quiz to test your new skills.

Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

5. Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

This lesson will explain how to distinguish between fact and opinion. We'll define the two terms, learn how to determine whether a statement is a fact or an opinion, and practice this skill.

Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

6. Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

As it turns out, you may be learning more from a text than you realize. That's because in every text, some information is inferred. In this lesson, we're going to see how drawing inferences from an informational text can help us better understand it.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

7. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

8. Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

In this lesson, we will define and learn how to recognize biases, assumptions and stereotypes in written works. We will also practice identifying these elements with a few writing samples.

Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

9. Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

What is a research question, and why is it important to get it right? This lesson will explore one way to write a research question, which guides a researcher in designing his or her experiment.

Gathering Relevant & Essential Information in Research

10. Gathering Relevant & Essential Information in Research

In this lesson we will discuss how to distinguish relevant and essential information from irrelevant and incidental information when doing research. This will help when you are researching a topic or writing a paper.

Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

11. Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

It's important to have information that is reliable, credible, and worthwhile in your speech. Sometimes, it's hard to determine these factors. This lesson will help you!

Ways to Show Information: Visual, Oral & Quantitative

12. Ways to Show Information: Visual, Oral & Quantitative

There are many different ways to present information, and all have their own advantages. In this lesson, we'll learn about the three major ways to show information - visual, oral, and quantitative presentations - and the benefits of each.

What Is a Bibliography and When Should I Write One?

13. What Is a Bibliography and When Should I Write One?

In this video we are going to cover what a bibliography is, why they are used, various types of bibliographies, how to create a bibliography, and when to know if you should use a bibliography.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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