Ch 4: Reading Skills & Instruction

About This Chapter

Providing effective reading instruction can be a challenge, but you can teach your students reading skills by employing several strategies that will be reviewed in this chapter.

Reading Skills & Instruction - Chapter Summary

The techniques you decide to use while providing instruction when it comes to reading skills can make a big difference in a student's ability to read. Through this chapter's useful text and video lessons, you will learn how supporting details lead back to the main idea, the definition of a summary, and how to reconstruct the sequence of events in a selection. These mobile-friendly lessons will also teach you ways to predict events in a selection by using its details, how to arrive at conclusions, methods to compare ideas in a selection, and how to distinguish between a fact and opinion. In addition, you will also be able to answer brief quiz questions about the definition of the author's purpose, the link between writing and reading skills, ways to create higher-level thinking questions to use during reading, and how to scaffold reading instruction.

How It Helps

  • Works backwards: Your understanding of how to instruct a student to determine the main idea through supporting details will enable you to work those types of activities into your curriculum.
  • Identifies elements: Because you will learn how to teach students the ways of distinguishing between a fact and opinion in a text, you can teach them the elements of both.
  • Highlights the correct questions: Your knowledge of the effect of higher-level thinking questions on learning to read will help you develop the right ones for your students.

Skills Covered

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to:

  • Teach your students how to find the main idea by analyzing the supporting details
  • Identify the concept of a summary
  • Help your students make inferences about what happened in a text
  • Create activities to help students make story-line predictions, draw conclusions, and compare ideas
  • Introduce reading material to students that include fact and opinion and have them identify them
  • Help students identify an author's purpose
  • Use students' writing to help them read better
  • Think of the appropriate high-level thinking questions to help your students understand written works better
  • Perform the scaffolding of reading instruction to enhance reading skills

17 Lessons in Chapter 4: Reading Skills & Instruction
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

1. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

What is a Summary? - Definition & Concept

2. What is a Summary? - Definition & Concept

In this lesson you'll learn what summaries are and how they differ from other forms of condensed writing. You'll also be shown an example of a summary, and what should and should not be included in a summary paragraph.

Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

3. Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

News articles or other types of informational texts can be structured through a sequence of events or steps. In this lesson, we will examine how that is done and how to identify this structure.

How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

4. How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

Making predictions when reading is an important reading comprehension strategy. In this lesson, we will discuss why it is important and how to model and practice it.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

5. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

How to Compare & Contrast Ideas in a Reading Selection

6. How to Compare & Contrast Ideas in a Reading Selection

The ability to compare and contrast the many ideas in one reading selection can be an overwhelming task. This video lesson gives a step-by-step method of how to successfully compare and contrast ideas in a reading selection.

Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

7. Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

This lesson will explain how to distinguish between fact and opinion. We'll define the two terms, learn how to determine whether a statement is a fact or an opinion, and practice this skill.

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

8. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

How Writing Can Improve Reading Skills

9. How Writing Can Improve Reading Skills

Reading and writing are two of the infamous 'Three R's', so naturally we think of them as going hand-in-hand. But can specific writing instruction actually help reading? Turns out, yes. This lesson describes the connection between reading and writing and outlines strategies for using writing skills to boost reading.

Higher Level Thinking Questions for Reading

10. Higher Level Thinking Questions for Reading

Educational trends encourage the process of metacognition, or understanding one's own thinking. This requires a teacher to develop higher-level thinking questions. This lesson will help educators reach fluency in developing these kinds of questions.

Strategies for Scaffolding Reading Instruction

11. Strategies for Scaffolding Reading Instruction

Ever heard the phrase 'reading is the gateway to all learning'? Reading is one of the areas targeted by most states for assessment because it not only is a critical area in academics, but also an area where most students were not showing gains. This lesson will highlight strategies to help struggling readers develop skills to be successful in the classroom.

The SQ3R Method

12. The SQ3R Method

SQ3R is a powerful reading strategy that supports student learning. In this lesson, we will learn what the SQ3R method for reading texts is, when to apply it, and what the benefits of using it are.

SQ3R Template

13. SQ3R Template

Searching for a method you can teach your students that will help them study and remember what they read? The SQ3R method is a great choice! This lesson explains the method in detail and provides a template for use.

Phoneme: Definition, Segmentation & Examples

14. Phoneme: Definition, Segmentation & Examples

Phonemes are tiny units of sound in speech. When phonemes are combined, they can make up words. In this lesson, we will discuss what phonemes are, how to segment them in words and why they are important.

Dolch Sight Words for Preschool

15. Dolch Sight Words for Preschool

Preschoolers can prepare for reading by learning the Dolch sight words. In this lesson, you will learn about Dolch sight words and the words preschoolers need to know before kindergarten.

Dolch Sight Words for First Grade

16. Dolch Sight Words for First Grade

Dolch sight words can be incorporated into a variety of activities to help emergent readers identify these commonly used words and improve reading proficiency. Review 1st grade level Dolch sight words below, along with some fun age-appropriate activities and resources to use in your classroom.

Dolch Sight Words for Second Grade

17. Dolch Sight Words for Second Grade

Dolch sight words are specific lists that are used to teach students some of the most common words we use every day. Read on to learn more about Dolch sight words, how they are taught and for the official 2nd grade list.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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