Ch 12: Reading & Writing Poetry

About This Chapter

If you need to improve your poetry reading and writing skills, take a look at this self-paced language arts chapter. You can access these fun lessons and quizzes whenever you need to study for an exam, complete a poetry assignment or catch up in your English class.

Reading & Writing Poetry - Chapter Summary

Check out this convenient online language arts chapter to review useful poetry reading/writing methods. As you work through the chapter's short and engaging lessons, you'll study the applications of common poetic devices, see the differences between various types of poetry and analyze a few famous poems. Each lesson comes with a short quiz to help you retain the poetry concepts you study. You can access the chapter on any computer or mobile device, and our expert instructors are available to answer your questions. When you're finished working through the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Use different approaches/methods for reading and writing poetry
  • Interpret a poem's theme and main idea
  • Understand the functions of several poetic devices
  • Recognize examples of free verse and lyrical poems
  • Summarize the poems Ode to the West Wind and The Road Not Taken

8 Lessons in Chapter 12: Reading & Writing Poetry
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Different Approaches to Reading Poetry

1. Different Approaches to Reading Poetry

There are many approaches to reading poetry, depending on the purpose. In this lesson, you'll learn three ways to travel through a poem, from a technique that takes a few seconds to one that will allow a reader to dig into the depths of meaning.

Interpreting a Poem's Main Idea & Theme

2. Interpreting a Poem's Main Idea & Theme

Many poems have both a main idea and a theme. In this lesson, you'll learn techniques for finding both in poetry by studying a sample poem. Afterward, you can test your understanding with a short quiz.

Poetic Devices: Definition, Types & Examples

3. Poetic Devices: Definition, Types & Examples

There are many types of poetic devices that can be used to create a powerful, memorable poem. In this lesson, we are going to learn about these devices and look at examples of how they are used. We will also discuss their purpose to understand the importance of using them effectively.

Lyrical Poems: Types & Examples

4. Lyrical Poems: Types & Examples

From Shakespeare to Keats to Tennyson, many of the great masters of poetry have written short, non-narrative poems known as lyrics, which convey an emotion or image in carefully wrought language. We'll look at a few types and examples in this lesson.

What Is Free Verse Poetry? - Examples & Definition

5. What Is Free Verse Poetry? - Examples & Definition

Did you know that Walt Whitman, who lived in the mid-1800s, was influential in shaping the American identity? Find out how his writing style is connected to the King James Bible and the famous Beat poet Allen Ginsberg.

The Road Not Taken: Summary & Theme

6. The Road Not Taken: Summary & Theme

'The Road Not Taken' by Robert Frost is a well-known poem about the journey of life. This lesson will cover a brief summary of the poem, analyze its major theme, and test your knowledge with a quick quiz.

Ode to the West Wind by Shelley: Analysis and Summary

7. Ode to the West Wind by Shelley: Analysis and Summary

If you were a leaf clinging to a tree in autumn, a gentle breeze might be pretty intimidating. In this lesson, we'll study Percy Shelley's take on this in his poem 'Ode to the West Wind' as well as how he hoped the wind would help spark a revolution.

Fun Methods for Writing Poetry

8. Fun Methods for Writing Poetry

Writing poetry does not have to be challenging. Just about anyone can successfully compose a poem in just minutes! This lesson introduces several fun and easy methods for writing poetry and will conclude with a short quiz.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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