Ch 8: Reconstruction After the Civil War

About This Chapter

Watch online history video lessons and learn about the Reconstruction Acts, President Johnson's impeachment, the Redeemers and more. These easy-to-follow lessons are just a portion of our online study guide and video collection.

Reconstruction After the Civil War - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Use this chapter to follow the congressional debate over conditions for readmitting former secessionist states to the Union, as well as the extent to which social reforms were implemented to help ensure the rights of former slaves. Video lessons can also show you the political and social fallout that resulted from Congress' decisions in both the North and South. By the end of this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Compare and contrast Lincoln's and Johnson's plans for Reconstruction
  • Recognize the impacts of postwar legislation on African Americans
  • Discuss the response to Reconstruction in the South
  • Identify political shifts resulting in the Compromise of 1877

Video Objective
President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union Explores Lincoln's hopes for restoring the Southern states and bringing its people back into the Union.
President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan Depicts Andrew Johnson's intentions to reunite the Union and reconstruct the South.
The Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction Outlines congressional plans to pass the Civil Rights and Reconstruction Acts and extend the life of the Freedmen's Bureau.
The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments Discusses the content and passage of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution, known as the Reconstruction Amendments.
The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress Explains the conflict between the president and Congress over Reconstruction, as well as the results of the impeachment process.
Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects Describes the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction policies on the daily lives of Southerners.
Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy Highlights new social and governmental opportunities presented to African Americans during Reconstruction.
The Redeemers Illustrates how white Southerners responded to Reconstruction, and depicts actions aimed at reestablishing white supremacy, including the formation of terrorist societies like the KKK.
The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876 Shows how the political climate and the results of the 1876 presidential election worked to end Reconstruction with an informal deal known as the Compromise of 1877.

9 Lessons in Chapter 8: Reconstruction After the Civil War
President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

1. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

Before the guns of the American Civil War fell silent, President Abraham Lincoln was making plans for the reconstruction of the South. In this lesson, learn what his plans involved and the controversy surrounding them.

President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

2. President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

When President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the task of Reconstruction fell to President Andrew Johnson. He was soon at odds with many different factions in the nation. While Johnson was not successful in domestic policy, his administration had a few foreign successes.

The Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction: The Reconstruction Acts & Civil Rights Act

3. The Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction: The Reconstruction Acts & Civil Rights Act

In this lesson, we will explore the Radical Republicans' plan to reconstruct the South after the Civil War. We will discuss Congress' efforts to extend the Freedmen's Bureau and to pass the Civil Rights and Reconstruction Acts.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

4. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

5. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

Congressional Reconstruction, guided by Radical Republicans, aggressively pursued political equality for African Americans as defined by several pieces of legislation and the 14th Amendment. Conflict between Congress and President Andrew Johnson escalated until he was impeached.

Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

6. Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

In this lesson, we'll explore the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on the people of the South. We'll look at rights and opportunities for African Americans, economic growth, resentment and violence, and the sharecropping system.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

7. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

The Redeemers: Definition & History

8. The Redeemers: Definition & History

In this lesson, we will explore the reactions of white Southerners to Reconstruction. We will examine their grievances, discuss their sometimes violent backlash, and take a look at their political efforts to regain control of the South.

The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

9. The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

Since the end of the Civil War in 1865, Republicans had tried to Reconstruct the South and secure equal rights for African American men. But a series of factors convened to bring Reconstruction to an end in 1877.

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