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Ch 29: Reconstruction - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science

About This Chapter

Review the story of American Reconstruction to prepare for the history content portion of the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science test. This chapter will detail specifics of Reconstruction that may be included on the exam.

Reconstruction - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you will learn about the different paths Reconstruction took, and important political and social impacts of this time period in American history. These video lessons will address the following significant aspects of Reconstruction to help you feel confident about your knowledge in anticipation of the exam:

  • President Lincoln's plans for Reconstruction
  • The Reconstruction as continued by President Johnson
  • The election of Ulysses S. Grant
  • Amendments that relate to Reconstruction policies
  • African Americans and Reconstruction
  • How southern life changed after the Civil War
  • Women's suffrage and Americans in the West
  • The Indian Wars
  • Election of 1876 and the end of Reconstruction

You may use these lessons in a variety of ways to prepare for the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science test. Keep in mind as you view the video lessons that you may ask our expert instructors any questions you have. In addition, take the interactive quizzes at the end of each lesson to practice answering multiple-choice questions about Reconstruction.

Reconstruction - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science Objectives

The ORELA Middle Grades Social Science test has 150 multiple-choice questions pertaining to four different domains. Half of the test consists of history questions, meant to test your knowledge of historic information that would prove beneficial to know when teaching students in social science classes. This chapter will deepen your understanding of content pertaining to American Reconstruction to prepare you for the exam.

9 Lessons in Chapter 29: Reconstruction - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science
President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

1. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

Before the guns of the American Civil War fell silent, President Abraham Lincoln was making plans for the reconstruction of the South. In this lesson, learn what his plans involved and the controversy surrounding them.

President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

2. President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

When President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the task of Reconstruction fell to President Andrew Johnson. He was soon at odds with many different factions in the nation. While Johnson was not successful in domestic policy, his administration had a few foreign successes.

President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

3. President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

Ulysses S. Grant, the Union hero of the Civil War, was elected in 1868, the last U.S. president to have been a slave owner. Despite his popularity, the nation faced social, economic and political difficulties, and his administration was shrouded in corruption.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

4. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

5. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

Life in the South After the Civil War

6. Life in the South After the Civil War

Following the Civil War, the era of Reconstruction was a difficult time for Southerners. Their land was destroyed, their political institutions were overrun by outsiders, the economy was in transition and their society was in upheaval. It was in this climate that the Ku Klux Klan was born and the Redeemers sought to reestablish the Old South.

Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

7. Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

In light of slavery and the issues related to it, several consequential events are often overlooked in the mid- to late-1800s: the Homestead Act, completion of the the transcontinental railroad and the push for women's suffrage.

The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

8. The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

As America expanded into the West, whites often encroached on Indian land and resources. Many Native Americans defended their territory, leading to a series of conflicts known as the Indian Wars.

The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

9. The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

Since the end of the Civil War in 1865, Republicans had tried to Reconstruct the South and secure equal rights for African American men. But a series of factors convened to bring Reconstruction to an end in 1877.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science: Practice & Study Guide course

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