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Ch 12: Reconstruction: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The Reconstruction chapter of this High School U.S. History Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the American Reconstruction of 1865-1877. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the Reconstruction events and plans required in a typical high school U.S. history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other high school U.S. history work.
  • Identify the Reconstruction concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our high school U.S. history tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the American Reconstruction and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding Lincoln's plan for the Reconstruction, the 13th-15th amendments, President Grant's administration or any other Reconstruction topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their Reconstruction unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in high school U.S. history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the American Reconstruction simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the American Reconstruction on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss President Lincoln's Reconstruction plans.
  • Describe Andrew Johnson's attempts to continue Lincoln's Reconstruction plan.
  • Learn about Andrew Johnson's impeachment.
  • Examine the successes and corruption of Ulysses S. Grant.
  • Become familiar with the Reconstruction Amendments.
  • Understand how Reconstruction affected African Americans.
  • Take a look at life in the South following the Civil War.
  • Discuss the Transcontinental Railroad, women's suffrage and the Homestead Act.
  • Learn about the Indian Wars.
  • Examine the election of 1876 and the end of Reconstruction.
  • List the successes and failures of Reconstruction.

12 Lessons in Chapter 12: Reconstruction: Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

1. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

Before the guns of the American Civil War fell silent, President Abraham Lincoln was making plans for the reconstruction of the South. In this lesson, learn what his plans involved and the controversy surrounding them.

President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

2. President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

When President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the task of Reconstruction fell to President Andrew Johnson. He was soon at odds with many different factions in the nation. While Johnson was not successful in domestic policy, his administration had a few foreign successes.

The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

3. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

Congressional Reconstruction, guided by Radical Republicans, aggressively pursued political equality for African Americans as defined by several pieces of legislation and the 14th Amendment. Conflict between Congress and President Andrew Johnson escalated until he was impeached.

President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

4. President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

Ulysses S. Grant, the Union hero of the Civil War, was elected in 1868, the last U.S. president to have been a slave owner. Despite his popularity, the nation faced social, economic and political difficulties, and his administration was shrouded in corruption.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

5. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Life in the South After the Civil War

6. Life in the South After the Civil War

Following the Civil War, the era of Reconstruction was a difficult time for Southerners. Their land was destroyed, their political institutions were overrun by outsiders, the economy was in transition and their society was in upheaval. It was in this climate that the Ku Klux Klan was born and the Redeemers sought to reestablish the Old South.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

7. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

8. Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

In light of slavery and the issues related to it, several consequential events are often overlooked in the mid- to late-1800s: the Homestead Act, completion of the the transcontinental railroad and the push for women's suffrage.

The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

9. The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

As America expanded into the West, whites often encroached on Indian land and resources. Many Native Americans defended their territory, leading to a series of conflicts known as the Indian Wars.

The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

10. The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

Since the end of the Civil War in 1865, Republicans had tried to Reconstruct the South and secure equal rights for African American men. But a series of factors convened to bring Reconstruction to an end in 1877.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

11. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

Buffalo Bill Cody: Biography & Facts

12. Buffalo Bill Cody: Biography & Facts

In this lesson, we will learn about 'Buffalo Bill' Cody. We will learn why he is famous and what his 'Wild West' show was. We will review his career and reflect on his place in American history.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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