Copyright

Ch 27: Relativity in Time & Space Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Relativity in Time and Space chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach relativity and its function in astronomy in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Relativity in Time and Space chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

DayTopicsKey Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Classical relativityDefinition of classical relativity, distance and time, speed and motion
Tuesday General and special relativityHow general relativity accounts for the effect of gravity on space and time, inertial frame of reference, acceleration, definition of gravity
Wednesday Light and relativityHow classical relativity breaks down at fast speeds, speed of light, light year
Thursday Time dilationHow time slows for fast-moving objects relative to a stationary observer, examples of time dilation
Friday Space contraction
Mass and energy
How distance contracts for fast-moving objects relative to a stationary observer, definition of speed
Examination of the theory of relativity and why it says mass and energy are interchangeable

6 Lessons in Chapter 27: Relativity in Time & Space Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Classical Relativity: Distance and Time Relation to the Observer

1. Classical Relativity: Distance and Time Relation to the Observer

It is not enough to ask how fast something is moving. We must ask how fast something is moving relative to something else. This lesson describes how classical relativity is used to explain how speed is relative to the state of motion of the object and the observer. Examples are used to help understand classical relativity.

General and Special Relativity: Theory and Examples

2. General and Special Relativity: Theory and Examples

Special relativity accounts for the constant speed of light in the absence of surrounding mass. General relativity utilizes the concept of space-time to explain the effect of gravity on the speed of light. This lesson compares special and general relativity and provides examples of how the speed of light is affected by gravity.

Light and Relativity: Breakdown of Classical Relativity with Light Example

3. Light and Relativity: Breakdown of Classical Relativity with Light Example

The speed of light is constant regardless of the source of the light or the position of the observer. However, the components of speed - distance and time - are relative to speed. This lesson uses examples to explain how the relativity of distance and time accounts for the constant speed of light.

Time Dilation: Description, Explanation & Examples

4. Time Dilation: Description, Explanation & Examples

Time slows down for objects in motion. While this effect is not noticeable in everyday experience, it becomes apparent at speeds approaching the speed of light. This lesson defines this phenomenon as time dilation. Examples are used to help explain how time is relative to speed.

Space Contraction: Shortening Distance for Fast Moving Objects

5. Space Contraction: Shortening Distance for Fast Moving Objects

The length of a moving object decreases in the same direction it travels. This phenomenon is referred to as space or length contraction. Scientists have proven that space contraction occurs and becomes more prominent at speeds close to the speed of light. This lesson uses examples to explain space contraction and describes how space contraction accounts, in part, for the constant speed of light.

Mass and Energy: Description and Interchangeable Relationship

6. Mass and Energy: Description and Interchangeable Relationship

Einstein used E = mc^2 to prove that mass and energy are relative to each other. This lesson describes how energy can be converted into mass and mass into energy. Experimental results from particle accelerators are used to demonstrate the relative nature of mass and energy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support