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Ch 41: Research in Social Studies

About This Chapter

Our chapter on research in social studies was written by experienced instructors to assist you as you prepare for an important upcoming exam or to help freshen your knowledge of these subjects. Use any smartphone, tablet or computer to study at your leisure.

Research in Social Studies - Chapter Summary

You'll find research in social studies covered thoroughly in the lessons that make up this engaging chapter. As part of your study, these lessons address methods in social science research and methods for both primary and secondary research. Once you complete this chapter, you should be ready to:

  • Define social science research and topics
  • Differentiate between primary and secondary research
  • Outline the differences between fact and opinion in historical narratives
  • Interpret historical information in graphic formats
  • Understand history through cause-and-effect relationships
  • Evaluate major historical issues and events from multiple perspectives

In this chapter, we've provided resources and tools you can use to meet your educational goals that make it easy to understand these concepts. Before, during or after studying the lessons, take the accompanying self-assessment quizzes to check your understanding. There's no need to stress if you have trouble with a subject because our experts are available to answer your questions in the Dashboard.

6 Lessons in Chapter 41: Research in Social Studies
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Social Science Research? - Definition, Methods & Topics

1. What Is Social Science Research? - Definition, Methods & Topics

Social science research investigates human behavior. This lesson defines social science research, explains the methods used and the topics studied within the field.

Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

2. Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

Differentiating between different types of research articles is useful when looking at what has already been done. In this lesson, we explore some of the different types of research articles out there and when they would be used.

Differences Between Fact & Opinion in Historical Narratives

3. Differences Between Fact & Opinion in Historical Narratives

In this lesson, we will examine the difference between fact and opinion in historical narratives. We will identify examples of each, and we will see how both have a place in historical narratives.

How to Interpret Historical Information in Graphic Formats

4. How to Interpret Historical Information in Graphic Formats

Graphic formats such as charts, graphs, maps, diagrams, and even political cartoons are useful means of presenting historical data. This lesson explains the use of these measures and provides tips for interpreting the information presented in them.

Understanding History Through Cause-and-Effect Relationships

5. Understanding History Through Cause-and-Effect Relationships

Did you know that the seeds of the destruction of the Ming Dynasty were planted in 1492? Or an accidental suntan launched a multi-billion dollar industry? Cause and effect relationships are at the core of understanding history.

Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

6. Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

Ever watched a football game with someone who was cheering for the other team and disagreed on the validity of a call? Then you've encountered the same problem historians find with diverse perspectives.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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