Copyright

Ch 19: Rhetorical Strategies & Methods of Argument

About This Chapter

Learn about rhetorical strategies and methods of argument. Use these video lessons and short quizzes to help you write a great argument and utilize various methods.

Rhetorical Strategies & Methods of Argument - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, our instructors explain the different methods and strategies to structure, write and support an argument. They will also walk you through how to appeal to your audience using logos, ethos, and pathos. After completing this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Use details to support an argument
  • Identify rhetorical skills to improve essay writing skills
  • Evaluate rhetorical devices in writing
  • Evaluate reasoning in an essay or article
  • Understand common fallacies in arguments
  • Discuss how authors promote bias in texts
  • Identify an author's underlying assumptions

The professional instructors have created short, engaging lesson videos to help you learn these strategies. The videos are available at any time, on any internet connected device and the instructors are available for questions about the material. Lesson quizzes will help you track your progress through the chapter.

10 Lessons in Chapter 19: Rhetorical Strategies & Methods of Argument
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Write a Great Argument

1. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

2. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Using Details to Support an Argument

3. Using Details to Support an Argument

This lesson will help you to be prepared to make a more comprehensive argument by including details. You'll consider what's missing from arguments without specifics and what strategies to use to improve your supporting information.

Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

4. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

Appeal is an important aspect to writing, especially when your goal is to inform and/or persuade the reader in some area. In this lesson, we will examine the three main types of appeal: logos, ethos and pathos

Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

5. Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

In this video, you will explore the basics of identifying your purpose and audience and learn how to use effective rhetorical skills in your persuasive writing.

Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

6. Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

In this lesson, we will study a variety of rhetorical devices that commonly appear in written texts. We will look at rhetoric on the level of sounds, words, sentences, and figures of speech.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

7. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

Understanding Fallacy: Common Fallacies

8. Understanding Fallacy: Common Fallacies

There are hundreds of logical fallacies. Some are mathematical and complex, and some are deep and philosophical. In this lesson, you will learn about some of the most common types of fallacies you will come across in public speaking.

How Authors Promote Bias in Texts

9. How Authors Promote Bias in Texts

Do you believe anything a person tells you? If so, then you really need to read this lesson to learn how to recognize the ways an author promotes his or her bias in a text.

Identifying an Author's Underlying Assumptions

10. Identifying an Author's Underlying Assumptions

Whenever a writer puts pen to paper, chances are that he or she is making a number of assumptions about the reader. This lesson focuses on some of those assumptions and how to identify them.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support