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Ch 5: Romantic Period in Literature: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Romantic Period in Literature chapter of this American Literature Help and Review course is the simplest way to master this literary period. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the Romantic period.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering American literature material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn American literature. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the Romantic period or working with the authors
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning literature (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the Romantic period in literature
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra literature learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Romantic Period in Literature chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Romantic Period in Literature chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any Romantic period literature question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to the following questions including:

  • What were some of the characteristics of the Romantic style?
  • Who was the father of American literature and why did he use 'pen names'?
  • What makes Washington Irving a romantic writer?
  • How does free verse differ from blank verse?
  • Would 'Paul Revere's Ride' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's be considered blank or free verse?

11 Lessons in Chapter 5: Romantic Period in Literature: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

1. The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

This video introduces American Romanticism, a movement where literature focused on intuition, imagination and individualism. Authors such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow contributed to what became known as the American identity, as the new country did its best to distance itself from European tradition.

Washington Irving: Biography, Works, and Style

2. Washington Irving: Biography, Works, and Style

This video introduces Washington Irving, the father of American literature. Through his works, like 'Rip Van Winkle' and 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,' Irving developed a sophisticated yet satirical style while helping establish the American identity.

Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

3. Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

Everyone loves a scary story now and then. Learn how Washington Irving's famous story, ''The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,'' uses imagination and the supernatural to make it a Romantic piece of American literature that is still adapted by television today.

Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle: Summary and Analysis

4. Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle: Summary and Analysis

The story of 'Rip Van Winkle' is one of enchantments and escape. In this lesson, we look at how Washington Irving uses his words and Romantic characteristics to create the story's theme.

The Devil and Tom Walker by Washington Irving: Summary and Analysis

5. The Devil and Tom Walker by Washington Irving: Summary and Analysis

Romantic literature, such as 'The Devil and Tom Walker,' often references the supernatural. In this lesson, we learn how Washington Irving uses an allegory with symbols to create a moral tale about greed while incorporating the supernatural theme.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

6. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was known as a fireside poet because his poems were read by the fire as a means of entertainment. Learn about how he created American history through the use of musical elements, like rhythm and rhyme scheme.

Satire in The Devil & Tom Walker

7. Satire in The Devil & Tom Walker

In this lesson, we take a close look at Washington Irving's short story 'The Devil and Tom Walker' by reviewing the people and ideologies that it satirizes.

Characteristics of Romanticism

8. Characteristics of Romanticism

This lesson identifies five central characteristics of Romanticism, which was an intellectual and aesthetic movement that begin in the 1770s in response to the Age of Enlightenment and its emphasis on reason and rationalism.

Romanticism in Literature: Definition & Characteristics

9. Romanticism in Literature: Definition & Characteristics

This lesson will explore Romanticism in literature. We will define the Romantic movement by examining and exploring some of its most important characteristics.

One Summer Night by Ambrose Bierce: Summary & Analysis

10. One Summer Night by Ambrose Bierce: Summary & Analysis

This lesson will provide a summary and analysis of Ambrose Bierce's short story 'One Summer Night', with particular attention paid to the ways that Bierce uses language to create a mood.

One Summer Night by Ambrose Bierce: Themes & Setting

11. One Summer Night by Ambrose Bierce: Themes & Setting

This lesson will provide an overview of the setting and themes of Ambrose Bierce's short story 'One Summer Night' and offer some analysis on the ways these settings develop these themes.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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