Ch 2: SBA ELA - Grades 3-5: Sentence Types & Parts

About This Chapter

Give your student a firm grasp of sentence structure and agreement with these fun SBA for grades 3-5 English Language Arts study lessons. You can see how well your student understands the key concepts by having them complete the assessments.

SBA ELA - Grades 3-5: Sentence Types & Parts - Chapter Summary

No matter how busy your child's extracurricular life may be, you'll be able to find time to give them quality Smarter Balanced Assessments (SBA) for English Language Arts preparation with these lessons. In short, 10-minute-or-less chunks your student will get refresher courses on the ins and outs of sentences as they work through this chapter. In these lessons our experts explain:

  • Simple, compound, and complex sentences
  • The basic parts of a sentence
  • How to identify subjects
  • Sentence fragments and run-on sentences
  • How to avoid subject-verb and sentence disagreement

Our lessons are a practical and versatile platform for reviewing material your student is learning in school. The videos are designed to be fun and educational, and they are formatted to be compatible with mobile devices so your student can get their practice while on the road between school and soccer and gymnastics. Print out the lesson transcript for a study guide with key terms highlighted. Have students complete the chapter test to see if they are ready to move on to our other chapters or if they may need to review certain videos again.

7 Lessons in Chapter 2: SBA ELA - Grades 3-5: Sentence Types & Parts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Types of Sentences: Simple, Compound & Complex

1. Types of Sentences: Simple, Compound & Complex

Sentences can be categorized as simple, compound, and complex. In this lesson, you'll learn about all three, break down example sentences, and test yourself at the end with a short quiz.

Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Predicate, Object & Clauses

2. Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Predicate, Object & Clauses

Some of the most basic sentence parts are subjects, predicates, objects, and clauses. In this lesson, you'll define these parts, learn how they function in sentences and discover why that knowledge is important for the AP test.

How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

3. How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

Don't pass over this lesson! You may think you know how to find subjects and verbs in a sentence, but picking them out can be harder than you think. Identifying subjects and verbs is the first step to unlocking nearly everything else about English composition.

Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

4. Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

Sentence fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences are grammatical and stylistic bugs that can seriously derail an otherwise polished academic paper. Learn how to identify and eliminate these errors in your own writing here.

Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

5. Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

Learn all about verb tense and subject-verb agreement in our first lesson on this tricky topic. We'll look at examples to help you understand this concept.

Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

6. Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

Subject-verb agreement is a tricky beast. Learn which uncommon singular and plural nouns and pronouns are most likely to trip you up when trying to craft essays with good grammar.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

7. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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