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Ch 18: SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Analyzing Literary Fiction

About This Chapter

Consider our engaging video lessons for your middle school students' study of literary fiction analysis. These lessons and self-assessment quizzes offer helpful insights to ensure their success on the English language arts portion of the SBA (Smarter Balanced Assessment).

SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Analyzing Literary Fiction - Chapter Summary

Your 6th-8th grade students will benefit from this chapter that offers a wealth of information about the analysis of literary fiction when preparing for the SBA ELA (Smarter Balanced Assessment English Language Arts). The video lessons address the following topics for the test:

  • Types of fiction
  • Characterization and plot development
  • Analyses of tone, style and figurative language
  • Drawing inferences and themes used from other works
  • Comparison of fiction to historical facts

The instructors will guide your students' progress with fun videos and text lesson alternatives. Videos may be viewed as many times as wanted, and handy video tags help users find specific spots in the presentations. Quick quizzes accompany each lesson to give instant feedback, and there's an optional multiple-choice test at the conclusion.

11 Lessons in Chapter 18: SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Analyzing Literary Fiction
What Is Fiction? - Definition & Types

1. What Is Fiction? - Definition & Types

In this lesson, we will learn about fiction. We'll take a close look at its definitions and its types and explore the difference between literary and commercial fiction.

Characterization: Character Roles & Dialogue in Fiction

2. Characterization: Character Roles & Dialogue in Fiction

In this lesson, we will talk about characters and characterization. We will explore the various types of characters, examine some methods of characterization, and pay special attention to the role of dialogue.

Plot in Fiction: Definition, Parts & Subplots

3. Plot in Fiction: Definition, Parts & Subplots

This lesson explores plot in fiction. We will define the term, explore the various parts of a plot (exposition, conflict, rising action, climax, and resolution), and learn about subplots.

Plot Techniques in American Fiction: Definition and Examples

4. Plot Techniques in American Fiction: Definition and Examples

A novel's plot involves more than just what happens in the story. Authors employ a number of techniques, including foreshadowing, red herrings, backstory, and B-plots to enrich their stories.

Analyzing the American Short Story: Techniques and Examples

5. Analyzing the American Short Story: Techniques and Examples

Identifying the tone, setting, and mood in a short story can help you analyze that story. In this lesson, we'll think about those literary features in the context of a few well-known American short stories.

Interpreting Tone in Fiction

6. Interpreting Tone in Fiction

This lesson will explore tone in fiction. We will define tone, talk about various types of tone, discuss how authors communicate tone, and practice identifying the tone of some writing samples.

Style in Fiction: Dialect & Figures of Speech

7. Style in Fiction: Dialect & Figures of Speech

In this lesson, we will explore style in fiction. We will define style and explore some of the elements writers use to create their own personal styles.

Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

8. Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

In this lesson, we will discuss how to interpret figurative language in fiction. We will explore several types of figurative language and learn how to identify them.

Drawing Inferences in Fiction

9. Drawing Inferences in Fiction

In this lesson, we will discuss inferences in fiction. We will talk about what an inference is, learn how to make one and practice drawing inferences with some writing samples.

How Fiction Draws on Themes from Other Works

10. How Fiction Draws on Themes from Other Works

How do classic characters like Cinderella translate for our times? In this lesson, we'll discuss theme in literature, and you'll read about an example of how authors sometimes draw on themes from already existing works to appeal to contemporary audiences.

Comparing & Contrasting a Fictional Portrayal to Historical Accounts

11. Comparing & Contrasting a Fictional Portrayal to Historical Accounts

Many novels take events or people from history and treat them in a fictional manner. The author may make significant changes to the historical facts, but in doing so it can give the reader a deeper understanding of history.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Smarter Balanced Assessments - ELA Grades 6-8: Test Prep & Practice course

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